Summer at Trinity

It’s officially spring, even if the weather in Hartford is still adjusting to this fact. We’re nearing the final month of classes, and before we know it, summer will have come to Trinity. Many of my friends will be returning to their hometowns to work summer jobs or spend time with their family. During finals week, students begin to trickle out and campus becomes noticeably emptier. However, Trinity is by no means dead during the summers. Trinity and its students are active all year round! Here are just a few options for students who want to spend the summer at Trinity:

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  • Research: Because I’m a humanities student, people are often surprised to hear that I did summer research during my first summer at Trinity. There are lots of different opportunities for research across many different disciplines, with both on- and off-campus summer positions available. I chose to work on my research from home while also working at a part-time internship, but there are always student researchers living at Trinity for part or all of the summer.
  • On Campus Jobs: Because Trinity remains vibrant and active during the summer, there are several campus jobs that need to be filled in order to keep the college running smoothly. I have friends who stay on campus and work in IT, as tour guides, in the library, and as summer RAs.
  • Summer Classes: Need an additional credit to round out your major, or just want to pursue a subject you didn’t have room for in your schedule during the year? You can take a summer class at Trinity and live on campus while you do it!
  • Internships: The Career Development Center maintains an enormous list of internship and job opportunities for Trinity students, and many of these opportunities are based in Hartford. Take advantage of this and enjoy living in the city while you gain experience in your field.
  • Summer Study Abroad: Trinity has summer study abroad opportunities in Rome, Barcelona, Paris, Israel, and China. If that’s not enough, students choose their own study abroad programs and get them approved through the Office of Study Away. Through Trinity, you can spend your summer nearly anywhere in the world!

I hope this helps show just how many different ways students can be involved at Trinity even when regular classes aren’t in session.

Posted in Academics, Adventures Abroad, Around Campus, Barcelona, Class of 2021, classes, Community, In Hartford, Italy, job search, library, On Campus, Paris, study abroad, tour guides, Trinity | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selecting a School That’s Right For You

I applied to nine schools either Regular Decision or Early Action. I did not do Early Decision anywhere. I applied to public and private schools ranging from Wisconsin to New Hampshire. I told my family from the very beginning of the application process that I was not going to apply to any schools in my home state of Maine. I was incredibly indecisive in choosing which school to go to. It was the middle of April when I finally narrowed my decision down to two schools.

I visited Trinity three times during my senior year. I realized during these visits how community centered Trinity is. I found that students have a large presence on campus, and Hartford has so much to offer. I was impressed by the alumni network, small classrooms, beautiful campus, elite reputation, and challenging academics. During my visits I sat in on a class, toured the campus, interviewed, ate in Mather Dining Hall, and visited a friend. I think that for me, spending time observing how a Trinity student spends their time was integral in helping making my decision. After my visits, I was able to imagine myself as one of the students I was walking among. I truly believe that there is more than just one “right school” for everyone. However, I think it is necessary to spend time with or observing the student body to find the school that will make you most happy.

Although I don’t think I — or anyone — could have gone terribly wrong, I do think that Trinity is absolutely the best school for me. I am so happy to be a Bantam!

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Dorm Room Essentials

One of the most exciting things for me as I was getting ready for my Freshman year was decorating my dorm room. It is important to make your room your own and have all the essentials.

First, make it cozy. This is where you will be living for the next eight months so you need to make it a place where you will happily go to sleep, hangout with friends, do your homework, and even eat. Perhaps add string lights to create a nice ambiance, a couple throw blankets, extra pillows, a comfy rug and if your lucky to have enough space- add a chair/beanbag for guests.

One thing I could not live without in my dorm is a power strip. Unfortunately there aren’t that many outlets in my room which is why a power strip is essential. I now have all my electronics and chargers in one spot rather than having them sprawled out around my room.

Another dorm room must have is a mattress pad. This will make your bed feel just like your one from home. It will be super comfortable and you will never have trouble falling asleep.

Lastly, the most important dorm room essential is YOU. Your room should be a reflection of your hobbies, happiness, and life to show who you are as a person! Add a wall of photos, posters of your favorite band, a tapestry, and of course a Trinity College banner!

 

Posted in campus tour, Class of 2021, dorm room decorating, Dorms, First Year, first-year experience, Home, On Campus, Roommates, Trinity | Leave a comment

Clichés for Days: What I Take for Granted

Despite the recent heat wave that has decided to hit Hartford, fall is in full swing on Trinity’s campus. Maybe it’s the change in season, the halfway point of my second-to-last fall semester, or perhaps a combination of these two factors that has me feeling a type of pensive nostalgia. Whatever the case, there have been a series of events presented to me recently which have made me realize the various clichéd ways that I take my Trinity experience for granted.

This week, I attended my Contemporary American Prose class. I arrived ten minutes early because not only is it one of my favorite classes, but also because there is always banter back and forth between us students prior to when the professor arrives. We talked about the unusual weather, then someone made the observation that the drastic temperature change between this week and next would cause people to become ill. As we were laughing and talking about bad experiences at the doctor’s office, how an individual can tell if they have a-typical mono, or the appropriate length of a dentist appointment, I looked around the room at these individuals, and Trinity’s small size suddenly hit me. There was a student who had been in two other classes with me, one my freshman year, and the second during the summer semester I spent on campus prior to my sophomore fall. Another student I had met through mutual friends, and is living in the same room that I lived in last year within the same dorm. A third individual is also an English and film major, such as I am, and we had attended a variety of English and film-related events on campus this past semester. A fourth was my freshman roommate, a close friend who I had not known prior to coming to Trinity, sitting right beside me. Regardless of the commonality that we are all enrolled in the same class this semester, I had experienced a multitude of interactions with all of these people outside of this classroom. And then it hit me: this isn’t everyone’s college experience. This scenario must be relatively unfamiliar for students who do not attend a small liberal arts school. Upon this realization, it came to my attention that I take this facet of Trinity completely for granted.

The professor eventually arrived, and then broke the news to us that she would be handing back graded copies of the first big paper that we had turned in this semester. As a class, we spent the large majority of our time discussing writing techniques, and how we could each enhance our pieces to make them more clear and concise. She then mentioned her office hours, and claimed that she would be willing to accommodate our schedules, and meet with us as often as we desire in order to bring these works to fruition in their second drafts. Being a student here at Trinity, I knew that she meant what she was saying, especially because I’ve met individually with every professor that I’ve had here. There would be no TA or graduate student to review our papers, and even though she is attempting to render her own works while balancing her personal busy calendar, I did not doubt her statement in the slightest, and I realized how blessed I am to attend a school where the professors genuinely care to carve out time for their students.

Once our class got out of session, I left the English Department building and stood at the top of the stairs briefly. Not only could I see my roommate from my sophomore year, but I could also see two of my freshman mentees, a student in the class that I TA for, and one of my bosses. In addition to this compilation of individuals, I also saw quite a few people whom I did not know. As the people began waving at me and saying “hi,” this experience made me recognize a third feature of Trinity that I take for granted: the fact that even though I know quite a few students on this campus, there are always more people to meet. As a student here at Trinity, you will always have consistent opportunities to grow your Bantam network.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Academics, Admissions, Advice, Around Campus, Bantam Banter, classes, Community, courses, fall semester, On Campus, professors | Leave a comment

Why I Love Going to a Small School

When going through the college process, one of the first questions I had to ask myself in order to narrow down my choices was whether I wanted to go to a small or big school. After making a list of the pros and cons, I came to a quick conclusion that a smaller school would be a better fit for me. Below are some of the reasons why I love going to a small school.

Most of my classes this year consist of around 15 people. For many, that number can sound scary because there is a lot of focus on individual students rather than in a lecture of 100 people at a bigger school where the focus is solely on the teacher. In small classes, the dynamic is more of a student run class where each person contributes his/her thoughts into the discussion. I didn’t realize how impactful a small class would be until I came here. I am able to share my thoughts and express any questions I may have had. I have become more confident in class when speaking. I also am able to get more individual attention from professors who actually know my name, which helps when material is difficult and I need personalized help.

Another reason why I love going to a small school is the ability to have close relationships with my professors. Every professor offers office hours and are always available upon request. This allows students to get to know their professors on a more personal and casual level. Gaining a relationships is very important as your professors guide you throughout your four years as well as your future beyond college.

Walking around campus everyday, I always see a familiar face but at the same time I will always see new faces. Trinity’s friendly environment allows me to feel welcomed and comfortable. Sometimes, if a school is too big, it can seem a little intimidating, not knowing where your going or not seeing people you know. At a small college, your surrounding become quickly becomes friendly, and it becomes a place you can truly relax.

Posted in Admissions, Amsterdam, Around Campus, Banty the Bantam, campus tour, class of 2020, Class of 2021, classes, clubs and organizations, Community, First Year, first-year experience, Introduction, Lifestyle, On Campus, Trinity | Leave a comment

How to Deal with Homesickness in College

Every college freshmen, whether they liked to admit it or not, has dealt with some type of homesickness when making the transition into college. Of course it is all relative, for some incoming students had experience living away from home because of boarding school, so therefore the move into college wasn’t that big of a deal for them. For me personally, I was the type of person who had been going to a school with the same people from preschool until senior year of high school. I had always been a homebody and I loved everything about my small hometown, which you can imagine made it harder when it was time to enter this new chapter in my life. The thought of leaving friends, family and the safeness of home made me uneasy and nervous. Back in the fall, I knew that I was going to struggle in adjusting to the new dramatic change of independence and that homesickness was inevitable, but these strategies helped me change my perspective and grow to love the fun and freedom of college life.

First off, its really important to understand that what you are feeling and going through is totally normal, but it will get better and you will be able to overcome it. Moving to a new place can be overwhelming because you are suddenly engulfed in a completely new environment. Give yourself time to grow comfortable and accustumed to this new space by making your room a special safe haven. Being able to decorate and manage your own dorm can be really fun, so make it a warm environment that both excites and comforts you to call “home”. Another way to get over this homesick bump is to distract, distract, distract. Distracting yourself through activities, classes and time with friends is one of the best cures for homesickness. If you surround yourself with fun, positive people and involve yourself around campus, you’ll be so busy you won’t have time to be homesick. If you find yourself getting more homesick at night when you are falling asleep, try watching one of your favorite shows or movies to help get your mind off things. If you find yourself getting homesick when you are alone, then make an active effort to seek out your friends or meet new people during these times. If none of these strategies work for you and you still can’t seem to get out of your slump, consider talking with one of the many helpful resources that Trinity has around campus, like the Residential Advisors (RA’s), TRINsition Fellows or counseling center.

In the end, its important to remember that your home will always be your home but this new time and place in your life can be just as exciting too! It will take time but be patient with yourself, for it won’t take much time for you to fall in love with Trinity.

Posted in Advice, Around Campus, dorm room decorating, Dorms, First Night, First Year, First Years, first-year experience, Home, Lifestyle, On Campus, Orientation, Trinity, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Meet My Roommates, Pt. 1

I am still amazed by the fact that even after three years (and counting!) here at Trinity, I am able to meet someone new almost everyday, or become closer with someone who was just a friendly face. Even though 2,300 students may seem a bit small at times, I am always impressed by how friendly, accessible, and hard working the student body is. Senior year has been a great time to really solidify the friendships I made previously.

I am living in a Crescent Street townhouse with eight other girls, half of whom I really didn’t know all that well before we decided to live together! Even after just a month of living together, it has been so much fun to get to know each other, make fun of each other’s quirks, and motivate each other during the particularly stressful weeks. While there are times when nine people in one townhouse can be overwhelming, it is really great to know that I can walk back at any point in the day or night and know that there will be someone there to talk to and catch up with. Even though I am still getting to know some of them myself, I wanted to share a bit more about them…without further ado, meet Anna, Maggie, and Nicole!

Anna Tyler

Anna - Roommates BlogHometown: Essex, MA
Major: Biology
Involvement on Campus: TA, Central Services employee, Biology Club, HPAP member
What activity has been the most meaningful to you?
Being a TA allowed me to understand Trinity’s teaching methods from a new prospective while also allowing me to meet a range of new students.
What are you most excited for about senior year?
I am most excited about living with my closest friends in Trinity’s new townhouses.
What are you most sad about leaving behind when you graduate?
I am going to miss seeing my friends everyday, and of course Goldberg’s bagels.
Best memory at Trinity? My best memory at Trinity is meeting my freshmen year roommate who turned into my best friend and four-year roommate.
Favorite spot on campus? My favorite spot on campus is sitting on the quad by the chapel.
Favorite thing to do in Hartford? Go to Bar Taco for dinner followed by Ben and Jerry’s for dessert
Trinity bucket list item? To have a class in the old, converted chapel in Seabury Hall
Favorite Class/Professor? Favorite Class: Biology of Infectious Diseases, Favorite Teacher: Dr. Archer
Favorite thing to get at the dining hall? Sushi
After getting accepted to Trinity, why did you choose Trinity? I choose Trinity because of its strong science department and small class sizes. My older brother also attended Trinity and encouraged me to go.
Favorite residence hall? High Rise
One thing that every Trinity student has to do at some point during their four years? Go to Thursday night trivia in Vernon Social
Anything you would change about the school? I think Trinity should place more focus on present environmental concerns and further promote “going green.”

 

Maggie Elias

Maggie - Roommates Blog

Hometown: Pittsburgh, PA
Major: Public Policy and Law (Hispanic Studies and Writing, Rhetoric, & Media Arts minors)
Involvement on Campus: Writing Associate, Peter B’s barista, Global Ambassador, Club Lax, Pre-Law Society, Senior Editor for The Trinity Tripod
What activity has been the most meaningful to you?
I love being a Writing Center associate. It allows me to meet new people and learn about a wealth of academic pursuits.
What are you most excited for about senior year?
Living with some of my closest friends on crescent
What are you most sad about leaving behind when you graduate?
This incredible community – constantly going somewhere and seeing someone I know and care about.
Best memory at Trinity? I have way too many to just pick one.
Favorite spot on campus? Peter B’s duh
Favorite thing to do in Hartford? Eat – seriously the food in this city is underestimated
Trinity bucket list item? Climb to the top of the chapel – it’s the most incredible view
Favorite Class/Professor? Professor Cabot
Favorite thing to get at the dining hall?: Bistro’s Bacon, Egg, and Cheese minus the egg
After getting accepted to Trinity, why did you choose Trinity?
I applied to Trinity on a whim and I finally visited after I was accepted. I fell in love with the beautiful campus and how welcoming every single person was.
Favorite residence hall? Wheaton 212 forever, Crescent is a close second
One thing that every Trinity student has to do at some point during their four years? Pull an all-nighter in the lib – you meet some really fun people at those hours
Anything you would change about the school? More bathrooms in the library 100%

 

Nicole DesrosierNicole - Roommates Blog

Hometown: Ridgefield, CT
Major: Psychology
Involvement on Campus: President of the Psychology Club; work the Austin Arts Center Box Office; Psi Chi member
What activity has been the most meaningful to you?
The activity that has been most meaningful to me was being a teaching assistant because I got to re-experience a class I really enjoyed and act as a resource for other students, so that they could also excel in it.
What are you most excited for about senior year? The part of senior year I’m most excited about it is the change in mentality. Everyone wants to make the most of their last year, and not take anything for granted.
What are you most sad about leaving behind when you graduate?
I’m most sad to leave behind the friends. Even though we’ll still be my friends, seeing each other won’t be as simple as walking across the hallway.
Best memory at Trinity? There’s too many to just pick one.
Favorite spot on campus? My favorite spot on campus is the front porch of my crescent house.
Favorite thing to do in Hartford? My favorite thing to do in Hartford is go to a concert at the Xfinity Center.
Trinity bucket list item? Climb to the top of the bell tower.
Favorite Class/Professor? My favorite class/professor was either Psychology 101 with Professor Holt, or Religions of Africa with Professor Landry.
Favorite thing to get at the dining hall? My favorite thing to get at the dining hall is a strawberry, banana, and peanut butter smoothie from the Bistro.
After getting accepted to Trinity, why did you choose Trinity? I chose Trinity because of all the schools I looked at it was the only place I could picture myself being.
Favorite residence hall? My favorite residence hall has definitely been Crescent. You get to live with your closest friends, while still having your own space, and access to basic household amenities.
One thing that every Trinity student has to do at some point during their four years? One thing that every Trinity student has to do at some point during their four years is spend the afternoon on the quad with their friends.
Anything you would change about the school?
If I could change one thing about the school, it would be that the genre for Spring Weekend is finally Country.

Posted in Admissions, Community, On Campus, Res Life, Roommates, Student Experience, Trinity | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Beyond Four Years: Making Your College Choice

Where to spend the next four years? It’s an important question, and an enormous decision that colleges around the country ask students to make during the month of April.

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Hartford provides Trinity College students with the urban setting and career development resources to prepare them for life after college.

While I’d love to make that decision easier—and, of course, all of us in the Admissions Office are happy to help however we can—that’s not the purpose of this blog post. Instead, I want to encourage you to think about this decision as one that extends far beyond your four years on campus. Your college choice is really about charting a course through graduation into your career and the rest of your life.

So now that I’ve only raised the stakes of this already huge decision, allow me to share a bit about how we think Trinity serves students with an eye on life after college. Continue reading

Posted in Academics, Admissions, Advice, Around Campus, Community, First Year, Hartford, On Campus, Trinity | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Things I Learned After My First Semester

Even though this is only my second semester here at Trinity, I can confidently say that I have learned a lot, in and out of class. For most, going to college for the first time is a major transition, so there is a lot to learn.

Lesson #1- Learn how to manage your time wisely:

My first couple weeks at school, I was amazed at all of the free time I had. I wasn’t really used to having only a couple hours of class everyday and was overwhelmed by my free time. That being said, if you feel that you have a lot of ‘free time’, realize that it is never ‘free’- take advantage of that time and get ahead on work before everything starts piling up.

Lesson #2- Befriend your professors 

One of the major perks about this school is the size. Some of my classes consisted of only ten people which may seem intimidating, but you will soon realize and appreciate how close you can get with your professors. Every professor has office hours which you should really take advantage of. Even if you don’t have a question about the class, go in and have a conversation with them about anything! They will appreciate your efforts to reach out and it will benefit you in the long run. It is also nice to know a little background about your teachers, know where they came from, why they started teaching, and they will always have tips and suggestions for you!

Lesson #3- Try new things

It is really easy to continue your old ways because that is what makes many people feel comfortable, especially when in a new environment. It is important that you branch out, do something you would never have done. Join a club, try out for a sports team (even if its just at the club level), try foods you have never tried, take a class you never thought you would take before, and most importantly- meet new people. It is important to expand your horizons and  be open-minded because you will find out a lot about yourself that you had not previously known.

Lesson #4- Find your place of relaxation

I am not going to lie, college can be very stressful and it is important to learn how to cope with that stress and anxiety. Find that little niche at the Underground Cafe where you can listen to music, find a bench on the quad where you can sit outside and enjoy the environment around you, or find that cozy spot in your room where you can take a nice nap, and relax.

Lesson #5- Have fun!

For many, college will be the best four years of their life. It is a time to explore yourself, have fun, experience new things, and of course, learn. Be social, go out, and enjoy yourself from time to time. Make the most of your four years.

Posted in Around Campus, athletics, classes, Culture, decisions, Events, fall semester, First Year, first-year experience, Food, Lifestyle, Mather, Mather Quad, meetups, On Campus, professors, Trinity, Welcome | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Housing Selection Process

Trinity is a residential campus. The vast majority of the student body lives on campus for all four years. I love being a part of a community-centered living environment. There are twenty-six residence halls at Trinity. Some are older than others, but each hall has it’s own character and reputation.

All freshmen reside in residence halls in the “concrete jungle,” on south campus, with the exception of one hall on north campus. Upperclassmen can choose where they live through a housing lottery held every spring. Students are assigned a lottery number based on the determined rating of their building. I found this lottery system to be a rather convoluted process. For example, if you were unable to come, you were required to have a proxy complete the housing process for you.

This year, the housing selection process will be done entirely online. Susan Salisbury, the Director of Residential Life, held multiple housing selection informational meetings to outline the new process. She explained that the housing portal will open on April 6th, and students will have time between April 6th and 12th to add housing to their wish list. Groups can do so under the name of a “group leader,” who will select their wishes. After the 12th, Susan Salisbury said that lottery numbers would begin to process in batches. Once numbers have been assigned housing, you can no longer change your wish list, and the housing selection process is complete.

I think that this new housing selection process will be great for students and allow for much more flexibility in selecting. With all of the great residential housing at Trinity, I look forward to living on campus all four years.

Posted in Advice, Around Campus, Community, dorm room decorating, Dorms, First Year, First Years, first-year experience, On Campus | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments