Why Being an English Major is #Lit

Choosing a major isn’t easy – especially at a liberal arts school where students are required to take classes in varying disciplines in order to graduate. So how does one go about choosing a major their sophomore year? Although some students may arrive on campus their freshman fall knowing what they want to concentrate in, the majority of Trinity’s population arrives unsure.

From a personal perspective, I had a decent idea that English would be one of my primary majors, and I had some experiences within my first two years of Trinity that confirmed this for me.

  • First English class at Trinity.

I enrolled in my first English class here at Trinity my freshman fall. This course was titled “Intro to Literary Studies.” Although I am currently concentrating in Creative Writing within my English major, I had heard that this class was one of the major’s pre-requisites, and I had also been told that the professor for this class was incredible. This advice proved to be right, and helped to enforce my decision to become an English major. Throughout this course, we studied multiple types of literary styles from an assortment of different authors. Not only did this course introduce me to one of my favorite contemporary authors, but it also provided me with an opportunity to bond with an incredible professor who has still continued to be an immense influence throughout my Trinity experience today.

  • Attending a Career trek

Although I knew that I would most likely become an English major upon attending Trinity, I also knew that I wanted to enter a media-related occupational field upon graduation. Therefore, I was a little bit apprehensive of the lack of a communications major or program. My freshman spring, I saw that Trinity’s Career Development Center was hosting a “career trek” over Trinity Days: a four-day weekend that occurs once per semester. This specific “trek” included a trip to New York City in order to network with alums working within marketing and communications fields. Although these “treks” explore multiple occupational avenues within Boston, New York City, and Washington D.C., I chose to attend this New York City media trek because of its close link with my area of interest. Throughout the trek, we met six different alumni within multiple organizations in the city. Not only was the networking opportunity incredibly valuable, but most of these individuals claimed that throughout their time at Trinity, they had chosen to pursue a major in English with a Creative Writing concentration. Therefore, this experience helped me to solidify that I was on the right track in choosing a major for my duration at Trinity, and also for my post-graduation interests.

  • Discovery of a Creative Writing Thesis

A third defining experience that helped me to decide to become an English major was the discovery that I have the opportunity to write a Creative Writing Thesis. For Creative Writing concentrators here at Trinity, students can choose from a range of options including the opportunity to write a series of short stories, a novella, a memoir, a novel, one-act plays, or poetry samples. The idea of being able to spend a large amount of my senior year planning, crafting, and editing a large creative piece that I could work towards potentially publishing after graduation appealed to me immensely, and still excites me currently as I look forward to this experience, even though I have roughly a year prior to immersing myself in it.

Ultimately, I love to write, and because I love exercising this creative skill, I throw my efforts into it completely until I’m absorbed in the act itself. Although I am speaking from a mere twenty years of experience, if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that passion drives success, and if you’re able to incorporate your passion into your occupation, then you’re guaranteed to soar.

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