Avoiding Plagiarism: The Children In Room E4

Original text:

By 1974, Brown would be unable to stop the segregation that was ever more extreme up north. The argument at Sheff’s core is that such de facto segregation, born not from explicit laws but from a variety of causes, is devastating too.

 

Example 1: Plagiarize the original text by copying portions of it word-for-word.

By 1974, Brown would be unable to stop the segregation that was ever more extreme up north. The argument at Sheff’s core is that such de facto segregation, born not from explicit laws but from a variety of causes, is devastating too.

 

Example 2: Plagiarize the original text by paraphrasing its structure too closely, without copying it word-for-word.

The segregation that was extreme up North by 1974 was unstoppable by Brown. There were a variety of causes that led to the core argument presented by Sheff, and although they were devastating, they were not born from explicit laws.

 

Example 3: Plagiarize the original text by paraphrasing its structure too closely, and include a citation. Even though you cited it, paraphrasing too closely is still plagiarism.

The segregation that was extreme up North by 1974 was unstoppable by Brown. There were a variety of causes that led to the core argument presented by Sheff, and although they were devastating, they were not born from explicit laws. (Eaton, xiii)

 

Example 4: Properly paraphrase from the original text by restating the author’s ideas in different words and phrases, and include a citation to the original source.

Susan Eaton, Research Director at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School implies that there are numerous factors that have led to segregation and ultimately lawsuits like that of Sheff v. O’Neill in her book, The Children in Room E4. (Eaton, xiii)

 

Example 5: Properly paraphrase from the original text by restating the author’s ideas in different words and phrases, add a direct quote, and include a citation to the original source.

Susan Eaton, Research Director at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School implies that there are numerous factors that have led to segregation and ultimately lawsuits like that of Sheff v. O’Neill in her book, The Children in Room E4. According to Eaton, “The argument at Sheff’s core is that such de facto segregation, born not from explicit laws but from a variety of causes, is devastating too.” (Eaton, xiii)

 Works Cited

Eaton, Susan E. The Children in Room E4: American Education on Trial. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin of Chapel Hill, 2007. Print. (Introduction xiii-xiv)

 

 

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One Response to Avoiding Plagiarism: The Children In Room E4

  1. In step 4, the substance of the original quote disappeared. Perhaps a better way to properly paraphrase might have been something like:

    Susan Eaton, author of The Children in Room E4, argues that the Sheff case demonstrates how Northern-style de facto school segregation, which arises from multiple causes, can be as detrimental as Southern-style legalized segregation (xiv).

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