Avoiding Plagarism

In order to understand how NOT to plagiarize, one must actually know how to intentionally plagiarize. Knowing what plagiarism is allows writers to be able to write more carefully and avoid any trouble with academic honestly. The following are examples of what to do and what NOT to do. Enjoy!

Step 0: Original text: Select what you believe to be the most important passage from Susan Eaton’s book.

Portion: “‘I think that children can overcome the stigma of poverty…But, what they cannot overcome is the stigma of separation. That is like a damned spot on their being…a spot that, no matter what success you have, you van’t wipe it out. And that’s what segregation does to children; they see themselves as apart and separate because of the language they speak, because of the color of their skin.’” (1).

(1). Eaton, Susan E. The Children in Room E4: American Education on Trial. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin of Chapel Hill, 2007. 124. Print.

Step 1: Plagiarize any portion of the original text by copying portions of it word-for-word.

Example 1: I think that children can overcome the stigma of poverty…But what they cannot overcome is the stigma of separation.

Step 2: Plagiarize any portion of the original text by paraphrasing its structure too closely, without copying it word-for-word.

Segregation makes children see that they should be apart and separate because of what language they speak and the color of their skin.

Step 3: Plagiarize any portion of the original text by paraphrasing its structure too closely, with a citation to the original source (using any academic citation style). Remember, even if you include a citation, paraphrasing too closely is still plagiarism.

Segregation makes children see that they should be apart and separate because of what language they speak and the color of their skin (1).

(1). Eaton, Susan E. The Children in Room E4: American Education on Trial. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin of Chapel Hill, 2007. 124. Print.

Step 4: Properly paraphrase any portion of the original text by restating the author’s ideas in your own diction and style, with a citation to the original source.

Segregation makes children become aware of other people’s view of racism including the way they interact with each other and the different ways they look (1).

(1). Eaton, Susan E. The Children in Room E4: American Education on Trial. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin of Chapel Hill, 2007. 124. Print.

Step 5: Properly paraphrase any portion of the original text by restating the author’s ideas in your own diction and style, supplemented with a direct quotation of a key phrase, plus a citation to the original source.

When being exposed to segregation, children become more aware of the differences between each other. Children are able to still live their lives no matter hardships are coming their way, however, “they cannot overcome is the stigma of separation” (1).

(1). Eaton, Susan E. The Children in Room E4: American Education on Trial. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin of Chapel Hill, 2007. 124. Print.

 

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One Response to Avoiding Plagarism

  1. In the passage you selected from page 124, Eaton is quoting a teacher, Gladys Hernandez (who is named on the previous page). Therefore, a better way to write step 4 would be:

    According to Hartford teacher Gladys Hernandez’s testimony, segregation makes children become aware of other people’s view of racism, including the way they interact with each other and the different ways they look.(1)

    A similar revision would be appropriate for part 5. Also, let’s review how to insert footnotes in WordPress, since requires an extra step that I have not yet taught you.

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