Michael McLean: Senior Honors Thesis

Michael McLean examines archives at the Oklahoma Historical Society.

Michael McLean examines archives at the Oklahoma Historical Society.

Trinity senior Michael McLean has always been fascinated by Native American history. Particularly, he sees its underrepresentation in mainstream United States history as a striking opportunity for research. A visit to the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota last winter and related coursework at Trinity motivated him to pursue a senior thesis on the impact of the Civil War on Indian territory.

McLean is also a recipient of the Colin Leroy ’10 Research Fund, which assists history majors with research-based travel and other projects.

[Editor's Note: History@Trinity will publish soon an article describing the Colin Leroy '10 Research Fund program, which was established in 2012 to help seniors and rising seniors conduct research for their senior theses.]  

Following a recent visit to Oklahoma sponsored by the fund, he has kindly provided History@Trinity with the following statement on his trip:

“From October 23-27, I traveled to the Oklahoma Historical Society in Oklahoma City, in large part due to a grant from the history department set aside for thesis research.

My honors thesis, “We Thought We Had Some Trouble Last Year: Destruction, Survival, and Community during the Civil War on Indian Territory,” is focused on what is today Oklahoma. I am also approaching this subject from the bottom-up. Therefore, the archives in Oklahoma were extremely useful. I was able to use letters, diaries, ledgers, rosters, and war claims to better understand the everyday experiences of regular civilians and soldiers in the area, especially with regards to food, communication and seasonality.

I will specifically be looking at the surprising adaptations that were used during this tumultuous period and how people were able (or forced) to create and maintain communities for their survival.

I am sincerely grateful towards the History Department and the parents of Colin Leroy ’10, who created the research fund, for affording me this opportunity.”

The History Department commends McLean and all other senior thesis students on their hard work.

We also encourage current juniors to consider writing a thesis next year. Please contact your academic advisor and visit the application procedure page available on this website through the menu that appears at the top for more information.

Procedures for 2014–2015 Senior Theses

Students writing senior theses in the History Department enroll in History 498-01 during the Fall semester. This course is a senior thesis research seminar taught by Prof. Darío Euraque, Chair of the Department. In the spring, students work independently to complete the researching and writing of an historical paper of up to 150 pages. A public presentation of the theses will take place in Seabury 215 on Thursday, May 1, 2014.

Senior Thesis Application Procedure

All juniors who would like to write a full-year senior thesis during the senior year must submit a thesis proposal. Applicants will be notified in writing of acceptance by the Department Chair by the end of the Spring semester. Continue reading

New Book on the African Diaspora by Prof. Euraque

Photo of the cover of the book "La Diáspora Africana en los programas educativos de Centroamérica," by Dario Euraque and Yesenia Martínez (2013)

Professor Dario A. Euraque, History Department Chair and Professor of History and International Studies, published his fifth book in Spanish this past August. He co-authored the book with Honduran historian Yesenia Martínez, former Director of the Historical Research Division of the Honduran Institute of Anthropology and History, and former Director of the Honduran Center for Research and Documentation at the National Archive of Honduras.

The book is titled La Diáspora Africana en los Programas Educativos de Centroamérica (Tegucigalpa: Editorial Guaymuras, 2013); in English, The African Diaspora in Educational Programs in Central America.

The photo on the book’s cover is by Professor Pablo Delano, of Trinity College’s Studio Arts Program. Trinity International Studies and English major Carolina Galdiz ’14 is currently translating the Spanish edition into English thanks to a Trinity College Faculty Research Completion Grant. The book features several additional photos from Professor Delano’s collection, which he took during his last trip to Honduras in April of 2009.

During the last ten years, the historiography of Central America has registered new contributions to the study of colonialism and the presence and ethnohistory of Africans and people of African descent in this region of the Americas. This has been especially the case in Costa Rica and Panama, followed by Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and lastly El Salvador.

Some of the most interesting studies have articulated their arguments and problematics with questions and debates associated with the literature on the African Diaspora in the Americas, in general, and with the older traditions of studying slavery in the region, including comparative perspectives with the United States.

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Lecture: Looking for War in the Landscape

Professor Megan Kate Nelson and Professor Gary Reger (Trinity).

Professor Megan Kate Nelson and Professor Gary Reger (Trinity).

On October 23, Trinity welcomed Megan Kate Nelson, a cultural and environmental historian with two published books who currently teaches at Brown University. She led a discussion entitled “Looking for War in the Landscape/Looking for Landscapes in the War” in which she analyzed the Civil War’s impact on the land of the United States and vice versa.

Nelson conducted extensive research in Virginia guided by a fascinating question: how can we access the experiences of the Civil War? The answer, she concluded, lies right beneath our feet: the land. In her research, Nelson studied “earthworks” and other physical remains of war. Some of these lay unnoticed on the outskirts of suburbs and others were formally preserved, and still others are missing. She found that the experience evoked by these earthworks was a reflection of their location and the landscape itself.

Nelson’s current research involves a narrative history of the Civil War in the Southwest, where the diverse eco-regions of New Mexico were the site of biological warfare. Whether concerning natural or built landscapes, Nelson’s insight into the diverse connections between land and warfare is compelling for historians and non-historians alike.

2013–2014 Thesis Writers

2014 History Senior Thesis Writers

ManuscriptThe following students are writing History senior theses during academic year 2013–2014:

  1. Robert Black – “The Behavioral Ecology of Animals in the Pacific Northwest and how it pertains to the Storytelling of the of the Native Tribes in the Region” – Advisor: Wickman
  2. Nicolette Chasse – “Chivalry and the family dynamic: knighthood and family in literature in medieval France” – Advisors: Elukin and Silk
  3. Hector Guzman – “A Land Without A State: Factionalism During the Warlord Era in China” – Advisor: Bayliss
  4. Michael McLean – “We Thought We Had Some Trouble Last Year: Destruction, Survival, and Community during the Civil War on ‘Indian Territory’” – Advisor: Wickman
  5. Emily Parsons – “U.S. Relations with the Soviet Union and Hungary in 1956″ – Advisor: Kassow
  6. Benjamin Plumer – “Southern White Identity and Incidence of Murder in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia” – Advisor: Gac
  7. Mollie Scheerer – “The Maya: Museums, National Patrimony, and Copán” – Advisor: Euraque

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History@Trinity will be providing later on more information on each thesis writer and her\his project. Please continue checking our blog in the coming weeks.

Message from Our Newest Historian: Prof. Jennifer Regan–Lefebvre

The History Department is delighted to welcome our newest member, Professor Jennifer Regan–Lefebvre, whom we recruited last winter through an international search to teach a variety of courses in British and British Imperial history.

Prof. Jennifer Regan-LefebvreProf. Regan–Lefebvre earned a Ph.D. from Queen’s University Belfast in 2007 and a B.S. from Georgetown University in 2003. She has taught at the University of Exeter, the American University of Paris and the University of Cambridge, where she was a fellow, the Director of Studies in History and the Assistant Tutor at King’s College.

History@Trinity hopes to publish soon excerpts from an interview in which she discusses in detail her research and teaching and her plans for the near future.

In the meantime, Prof. Regan–Lefebvre has kindly provided us with the following statement:

“I am delighted to be joining the History Department at Trinity in 2013 and am looking forward to getting to know students and colleagues at Trinity.

My expertise is in British and British Imperial history and I’m particularly interested in how modern Britain was shaped and affected by the British Empire.

I’ve written a book about relations between Irish and Indian nationalists in the nineteenth century and I’ve also published on the history of travel, race and racism, and the press. I am currently researching a history of the London wine trade since 1800.

In 2013-2014 I’ll be teaching a First Year Program seminar on the history of London (“London: Traditional, Modern and Global”) plus three History courses: “Modern Britain and Imperial Culture,” “Modern Britain since 1750” and “Modern Ireland, Global Ireland.”

I’m originally from Massachusetts but have lived in Europe for eighteen years.  I’m very excited to be returning home to New England and am particularly looking forward to watching the leaves change on the Trinity campus this fall.”

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Prof. Lestz Awarded Alumni Medal for Excellence

Professor Michael Lestz

Professor Michael Lestz

During last week’s Trinity reunion weekend, History Professor Michael Lestz was awarded the Alumni Medal for Excellence. This medal is awarded annually to alumni who have made significant contributions to their professions, to their communities, and to Trinity College. Congratulations Michael!

Read the full citation here. Continue reading

History 366 Interpreting the Ancient City: Angkor

HIST 366 at the Royal Palace

HIST 366 at the Royal Palace

“HIST 366: Interpreting the Ancient City: Angkor” was a hands on field investigation that traveled to Cambodia in May and June. Launched with the scholarship aid provided by the O’Neill Asia Cum Laude Endowment and the Charlotte Riggs Scholarship fund, ten Trinity students and four professors were able to travel to Phnom Penh and Siem Reap to do in depth study of ancient and modern Cambodia. History Department professors Michael Lestz and Dario Euraque, and Prof. Pablo Delano (Studio Arts) led the ten Trinity students to Phnom Penh and Siem Reap in a rich exploration of the themes of the course. As we visited material remains of Angkorean cities just north of Cambodia’s great freshwater lake accompanying the group as an associated faculty member was Dr. Rodolfo Pastor Fasquelle, who served twice as Minister of Culture of Honduras, between 1994 and 1998, and between 2006 and 2009. Faculty and students benefitted from Dr. Pastor Fasquelle’s  vast knowledge of the ancient Mesoamerican world and especially the Mayan World Heritage site of Copan in Honduras.

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Toe the Line Exhibition at the Watkinson Library

Title of Exhibit: Toe the Line School Rules in 19th-Century America

Description: School catalogs and reports drawn from the professional library of educational reformer Henry Barnard. “Henry Barnard was born on January 24, 1811, in Hartford, Connecticut. From 1837 to 1839, he belonged to the Connecticut state legislature. In 1838, he founded the Connecticut Common School journal. In 1845, he became Rhode Island commissioner of public schools. He was hired as the U.S. first commissioner of education in 1867 and resigned in 1870. Barnard died on July 5, 1900, in Hartford, Connecticut.”

Dates: June 14-August 16, 2013

2013 Commencement Program, Trinity College, Hartford, CT

Trinity Convocation 2013

The 187th Commencement of Trinity College took place on Sunday, May19th. Over 20 students received undergraduate degrees in History. In addition, Professors Antrim, Bayliss and Kassaw of the History Department won prestigious awards for their research, scholarship and teaching. Professors Antrim and Bayliss were awarded the Charles A. Dana Research Award while Professor Kassaw was this year’s recipient of the Thomas Church Brownell Prize for Teaching Excellence. Congratulations to all graduating seniors and honored faculty.

For more photos: Continue reading