CategoryNews & updates

Security Changes Coming April 23

Re-post of Antonio Crespo’s 3/28 email, “Enhanced Security for Systems on Trinity Campus”:

To improve the security of Trinity College systems and data, we are working on increasing the security of our servers, networks, and systems that are currently exposed to the internet.

To that end, we are looking to restrict external access to personal computers and systems on our network to protect them from internet-based attacks. In the first phase, we are changing the way that people can connect to personal computers on our campus from a remote location to a more secure solution.

So, if you currently use a “Remote Desktop” client to connect to computers or systems on campus from remote locations, please follow the instructions below to configure your connection to use our Remote Desktop Proxy Server before April 23rd to maintain your access.

Common services like email, websites, VPN, etc. will not be affected by this or future planned changes. However, if you remotely connect to systems on campus by uncommon means, please complete the very brief survey below to let us know so that we can incorporate that into future planning. (e.g., SSH, VNC, FTP, personal or departmental webserver, etc.)

Instructions on how to connect using our new Remote Desktop Proxy: http://www.trincoll.edu/LITC/its/computing/Pages/default.aspx

Tell us about uncommon ways that you remotely connect to services on the Trinity network by completing this brief survey

We will send additional reminders. If you have questions or issues with remote access, please contact the helpdesk.

Best,
Antonio

ANTONIO CRESPO
Chief Information Security Officer (CISO)
Trinity College
http://www.trincoll.edu/LITC/its/security/

We’re Hiring a Digital Humanities Postdoc!

a book and a computer

 

An exciting development at Trinity College this year was the receipt of a Mellon Foundation Grant for Arts, Humanities, and Digital Scholarship. This will bring lots of opportunities to faculty and students across campus.

Information Services is delighted to be able to say that as part of this grant, we are hiring a digital humanities postdoc to work closely with Christina Boyles (our recently-hired digital scholarship coordinator) and Jason Jones (um, me) to develop undergraduate offerings in the digital humanities.

Projects that the successful candidate might find themselves working on might include: supporting faculty research projects in the digital humanities; developing training programs on DH tools or methods in conjunction with other IS staff; researching undergraduate digital humanities credentials, such as certificates; teaching; or other possibilities not yet envisioned. (Not all at once! The idea is that there are a wide range of opportunities for the successful candidate both to get involved on campus *and* to position themselves well for the job market.)

The disciplinary focus is less important than a deep familiarity with digital humanities methods and tools. The position is full-time and benefits-eligible, and is located, as I’ve mentioned, in Information Services (the merged IT/library) rather than an academic department. The position is funded for 2 years.

Here is the link to the official job posting. We do anticipate beginning the review of applicants by the end of March.

If you have any questions, please contact Christina Boyles & Jason Jones.

Photo “Day 158: Diffusion of Knowledge” by Flickr user Quinn Dombrowski / Creative Commons licensed

Greatest Hits in Educational Technology: Episode 1 – Teaching Neuroscience with a $60 Web Cam


 

This video documents how Dr. Chris Swart, a faculty member in Neuroscience, used $60 webcams to teach an advanced exercise in his neuroethology lab, NESC-362, Fall Semester 2017.

Not only does the video highlight how low-cost technology can be used effectively in an advanced science lab, but it also showcases the video production skills of the Student Technology Assistants in the Center for Educational Technology. The students did all the work to create this video, which started from filming the lab session and finished with audio and video editing in Adobe Premier.

Interested in learning more about the STA program or how to create your own videos? Contact your Instructional Technologist!

Join Our Transcribe-a-Thon for Douglass Day on 2/14

On 14 February 2018, please join us in the Trinity College Library’s new Digital Scholarship Studio (LITC 182) for a transcribe-a-thon in honor of Frederick Douglass’s 200th birthday. Following the lead of the Colored Conventions project, we’ll be transcribing records of the Freedmen’s Bureau.

The Transcribe-a-thon is from 12-3pm, and is open to the public. Cake and coffee will be provided. If you have any questions, please contact Christina Boyles or Jason B. Jones.

Join Our Team:
We’re Hiring an Instructional Technologist

instructional technology

Trinity College is hiring an instructional technologist this fall. (It’s a replacement position*, not an expansion of the group.)

While the ad speaks for itself to some extent, I did want to highlight some other reasons why this is a good moment to join us.

The college has made significant investments recently in the educational technology group, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future:

  • We’re now a Domain of One’s Own campus, with a pilot currently underway and a more formal rollout slated for the spring.
  • With the help of a donor and some of our own money, we’ve been investigating emerging technologies such as 3D printing (available to the campus for free), virtual reality machines, and drones. One of the instructional technologists has been leading a working group to get a policy approved for the campus, and has helped kick-start a student drone club.
  • The college has just added a digital scholarship coordinator, Christina Boyles, and is building a Digital Scholarship Studio, which will come online in January. This will add two learning spaces, a recording studio, an imaging room, and a couple of meeting rooms to the usable space of the library.
  • Educational Technology is housed in a newly-redesigned space that supports collaborative student work as well as innovative technological pedagogy.
  • We’re doing a lot of cool projects–we were part of the #prmapathon for Puerto Rico a couple of weeks back, and are launching a physical computing working group this fall. We support a portfolio program that we expect to grow over the next couple of years.
  • We develop courses for edX, and have some more very exciting courses in the pipeline.
  • Instructional technologists have freedom to teach, both in the form of workshops but also in Trinity’s J-Term program (one instructional technologist, Cheryl Cape, is team-teaching a course on modeling financial data in our Bloomberg lab; the other, Dave Tatem, is team-teaching a course on drones and mapping) and interdisciplinary courses in research methods.
  • I take professional development seriously as a manager, and send people to conferences and help them make presentations and publish articles.

Over the past couple of years, we have laid the groundwork for some major developments in educational technology and digital scholarship, and they are starting to bear fruit. We welcome applications for the position, ideally before Thanksgiving; in the meantime, if I can provide any helpful information about Trinity or about our group, please don’t hesitate to be in touch!

*The person who’s leaving is going to an instructional design job at a startup in Brooklyn.

Photo “OG Instructional Technology” by Flickr user Tom Woodward / Creative Commons licensed BY-NC-2.0

ToW: Add course materials to Moodle from the new Library OneSearch

Tip of the WeekThe Library’s new OneSearch offers fast and easy access to library books, articles, films, audio, and more. Many of these materials are available online so that your students can access them directly from any of their devices. 

With OneSearch, it’s easy to build course reading and play lists by grabbing the permanent URL for items you find and pasting them into Moodle. 

 

To get started, go to the Library home page and enter your search term(s) in the OneSearch box: 

 

On the results page, you will want to sign in to be sure you are seeing all of your options. Also note the various ways you can filter your results on the left side of the page: by Library, article type, material type (video, audio, book, article), etc. 

 

When you click on the title of an item, you’ll see additional details. Click the Permalink button to reveal the permanent URL, and then “Copy the permalink to clipboard,” which will allow you to paste the link into your Moodle course. 

Voilà! 

Summer changes for the Educational Technology site

Over the next few weeks, we will be making some edits to this site’s content structure and design. Changes will be rolled out gradually, so that by early July we should have a newly refreshed site. 

We hope that the new structure will make things even easier to find, but if the information you seek remains elusive, please feel free to contact your Instructional Technologist! 

Looking back at #Domains17

Trinity Ed Tech folks at #Domains17

#Domains17

This week, most of the educational technology group went to Oklahoma City for the Domains 2017 conference, jointly hosted by Reclaim Hosting and the University of Oklahoma.

We went because we are quite close to setting up a pilot instance of Trinity Domains, a Domain of One’s Own project (see also: A Domain of One’s Own in a Post-Ownership Society) that will give faculty, students, and staff the digital infrastructure to stake out their digital identity and develop new, exciting forms of scholarship. Since setup is imminent, the conference seemed like a good way to see what other schools were doing, and to make connections for when we inevitably need help.

We’re launching the project because we want to be able to support as much open, web-based teaching, learning, and scholarship as possible, in as many forms as possible, and we want to make it as easy as possible for people to experiment online.

I don’t think any of us at Trinity were well-positioned to do a proper “review” of #Domains17, as we don’t yet have access to the Domain of One’s Own setup, and so don’t have fingertip knowledge of what’s easy, what’s hard, or anything like that.

In lieu of that review, then, here’re a few thoughts:

  • #Domains17 was a great short-conference experience, at an interesting venue and with lots of very friendly, collaboration-minded people. Lauren Brumfield, Adam Croom, Jim Groom, and everyone associated with the conference deserve a lot of credit. 13/10, would attend another event.
  • Martha Burtis’s keynote, “Neither Locked Out Nor Locked In,” is a really great starting point for thinking tangibly about some of the reasons one might want to pursue a Domains project.
  • It also primed me with a thought that held up very well throughout the conference: Her entire section on “WordPress as Symbol and Choice” decries the fact that WordPress often becomes the default way to inhabit a domain of one’s own, which is . . . problematic. Students and faculty need to be free to have domains with different technology options, even if we all have to stretch a bit in terms of what we support, and what people have to support on their own a little bit.
  • Once you’d heard that talk from Martha, it was hard not to realize that the conference schedule was quite WordPress focused. There were more examples of “here’s how to do a cool thing in WordPress” than there were examples of “here’s a successful instructional use of Domains.” This is neither good nor bad as such, but it was just interesting to see the lay of the land. Since we have two multisite WordPress installations on campus, the temptation to default to WordPress will be something to both resist and work with.
  • Switching gears a little: On a personal note it was neat to see Jon Udell talk about annotation. It’s probably not the thing he’d pick to be known for, but I’ve shown his screencast on Wikipedia & the heavy metal umlaut to thousands of people over the years.

There will be more thoughts on this over the summer—and I’d certainly invite Amy and Dave and Sue to chime in with their impressions—as we get started. Certainly it’s the case that I jotted down a ton of things to look into as soon as we’re up and running, which I hope to be able to report on soon!

Photo with all four of us by Tom Woodward, shared under a Creative Commons-BY-SA-2.0 license

Join Our Growing Digital Scholarship Team at Trinity!

screenshot of a story map

Why Work on Digital Scholarship at Trinity?

A week or so ago, Trinity College posted a job opening for a digital scholarship coordinator, a position designed to build on recent momentum in digital humanities and other forms of born-digital scholarship. We anticipate that the successful candidate will work with faculty interested in conceptualizing new methods or modes of research, as well as with students looking to build digital research skills for a thesis or other forms of scholarship. The digital scholarship coordinator will work closely with the educational technology group and the library in support of all this work.

The digital scholarship coordinator posting speaks for itself, but I did want to highlight a few things that might make this post even more attractive than I think it already is:

  • We’re currently beginning to design a digital scholarship studio in the library, which the successful candidate will have significant input in finalizing and implementing.
  • We are seriously evaluating partnering with Reclaim Hosting’s Domain of One’s Own program to ensure that our students and faculty have the digital infrastructure to develop exciting new projects. I am not a gambler by nature, but there is every possibility that we’ll have reached an agreement by the time interviews for this position start.
  • Staff support for digital scholarship projects is already quite sophisticated–we have expertise in WordPress, GIS, timelines, 3D printing, and more.

We’ve been building toward being able to make this move for several years now, and it’s a very exciting development in Information Services that we’re able to go forward.

The most compelling reaason to come to Trinity as the digital scholarship coordinator is that we have terrific faculty who are already doing exciting work in this field. While this blog post can’t begin to do justice to the rich environment you’ll find here, let me just briefly mention a few we’ve either supported or are in development:

  • Jack Dougherty (Educational Studies) draws on digital history and data visualization tools to reveal the relationship between schooling and housing over time. Examples include On the Line: How Schooling, Housing, and Civil Rights Shaped Hartford and Its Suburbs (currently hosted at TrInFo Cafe’s PressBooks; under contract with Amherst College Press); Data Visualization for All, Web Writing(U of Michigan P, 2015), and Writing History in the Digital Age(U of Michigan P, 2013). You can see his course syllabuses on our WordPress site.
  • Jack Gieseking (American Studies) uses digital methods and analytics to visualize and make public hitherto invisible lgbtq histories and geographies. All of his work is online at http://jgieseking.org/cv, but let me specifically call attention to two ongoing projects, The Queer Public Archives and the Trans Tumblr Project, as well as his course on Data-Driven Cultures.
  • Alden Gordon (Fine Arts) has worked with his students to develop art+Hartford: A website that catalogs public art in the Hartford area, with photographs and scholarly entries for each item. The site is designed for mobile devices, and includes customizable walking tours of the area’s public art. Alden is also working on a digital mapping project illustrating travel in the 18thC.
  • Seth Markle (History/International Studies) is working with the Hartford Public Library’s Hartford History Center to develop a digital archive about the history of hip hop in Hartford.
  • A variety of faculty have developed assignments that build on mapping or other forms of digital storytelling that aren’t currently publicly available. Cheryl Greenberg (History) had students crowdsource a story map (pictured above) showing how the civil rights movement unfolded in a small Mississippi town. Zayde Antrim (History/International Studies) has students working concretely with maps. Beth Notar (Anthropology) and Molly Helt (Psychology/Neuroscience) have students produce digital artifacts during the semester. This list is very partial!

When it comes to teaching, the resourcefulness of the faculty is even more apparent, using tools such as hypothes.is, Zotero, Gelphi, QGIS, Google Docs, WordPress, and much else besides to accomplish myriad pedagogical goals. Some faculty also have student-driven research projects that could potentially become more open and public, but could use help making that happen. We have a dedicated, innovative faculty, and are poised to take further steps in the realm of digital scholarship and pedagogy.

If you have questions about the position, please feel free to get in touch! Again, the full job listing is here: https://trincoll.peopleadmin.com/postings/1308.

Visit the new Center for Educational Technology!

The CET is complete! Located on the south end of Raether LITC Level 1, the Center for Educational Technology is a newly remodeled space for collaborative and individual study using the latest in technology and applications.

The space is open 24/7; and staffed by Student Technology Assistants during both day and evening hours. (Hours available on the right.)

The CET is outfitted with large screens of various sizes that you can connect any device to; Mac minis with dual monitors, and some with Adobe’s Creative Cloud software suite; USB charging plugs in every outlet; 3D printers; virtual reality headsets; and of course – plenty of modern soft seating.

Visit us soon!