CategoryTools

Immersive Storytelling

Digital Storytelling is not a new concept. It has been a popular format for projects for years and is growing in popularity here at Trinity. With the increasing availability of 360 degree cameras and Virtual Reality Headsets (from cheap Google Cardboard type headsets to Oculus Rift and HTC Vive systems) Digital Storytelling is evolving to include a new format often called Immersive Storytelling. Immersive Stories can be 360 degree videos or fully developed interactive Virtual Worlds. The  formerly passive viewer is now an active participant in the storyscape. 

For a sample of the power of this approach see a The Wait which is a Masters Thesis project created by students from The University of California, Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. This project focuses on the refugee crisis in Europe with the goal of generating empathy for the conditions faced by immigrants waiting for asylum in Germany.

Immersive videos are starting to go mainstream with videos regularly being produced by the New York Times, the United Nations and screenings at the Tribeca Film Festival. We have made a few examples available on our Oculus Rift stations in the Center for Educational Technology including The Displaced and Clouds Over Sidra.

The Educational Technology Department is excited to support students and faculty who want to experiment with this new platform and we are in the process of procuring some 360 degree cameras for faculty and students to experiment with. If you want to experience the power of Immersive Storytelling for yourself or experiment with creating your own contact your Instructional Technologist or stop by the Center for Educational technology on Level 1 of the Library.

 

 

 

ToW: Make Timelines with Timeline JS

Want to tell a story? 

Need to organize a lot of information?

TimelineJS is a powerful, flexible, and easy way to quickly make a compelling and interactive visualization that can includes diverse kinds of media like images, video, audio, tweets, and even whole documents.

Check out this example, from the makers of TimelineJS:

Developed by the Knight Lab at Northwestern University, this free and open-source tool will format and present your work for easy navigation, using a simple google sheets template.

It’s been used by CNN and Time, and here at Trinity, in courses like Gender, Sexuality, and Space and Memory, Power, and Place.

 

Protip: You can go beyond linking and embed your timeline right in your post here on Commons like the example above.  Just copy the embed code from the TimelineJS site, and after you paste it into your post, change the angle brackets to square brackets  – “<” becomes “[“ and “>” becomes “]”

Copy the embed code from the site

Paste

<iframe src=’https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1xuY4upIooEeszZ_lCmeNx24eSFWe0rHe9ZdqH2xqVNk&font=Default&lang=en&initial_zoom=2&height=650′ width=’100%’ height=’650′ webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen frameborder=’0′></iframe>

 

Edit the brackets

[iframe src=’https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1xuY4upIooEeszZ_lCmeNx24eSFWe0rHe9ZdqH2xqVNk&font=Default&lang=en&initial_zoom=2&height=650′ width=’100%’ height=’650′ webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen frameborder=’0′][/iframe]

 

To skip this extra formatting and a whole lot more, consider using a Domains site!

 

 

ToW: New Screencasting Tool Available

Trinity has recently contracted with Kaltura streaming video services, which, in addition to providing online access to our video content, offers several media tools you can use in your teaching.

Capturespace screenshotCapturespace, at right, is a screencasting tool that actually does much more than record the screen. It offers several options for combining voice, screen, Webcam, and powerpoint. The “Presentations & Lectures” option at the top allows you to record a 2-in-1 cast: an on-screen powerpoint presentation in one window, with a Webcam recording of your commentary running in another window. Both windows can be moved around the screen during playback by the user. 

Capturespace is currently accessed through Moodle. Once logged into Moodle, click on “My Media” under the Dashboard in the upper left. Click “Add new,” then “CaptureSpace.” You will be prompted to download the application, and then you can get started. When you are done recording, your work will be saved in My Media in Moodle, and you can share it with any of your courses, or download it and share it outside of Moodle. 

If you have any questions or would like to come in for assistance, please contact Amy Harrell, amy.harrell@trincoll.edu

Digital Storytelling Resources

Tip of the WeekIn the Spring of 2017 The Community Learning Initiative offered a workshop on digital storytelling for community learning which was facilitated by Brianna Derr, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship Specialist for Video at Bucknell University. Brianna’s Digital Flavor site contains a wealth of information on digital storytelling projects including example projects, assignments, syllabi and many other resources. 

The site provides details on many assignments and types of projects including documentary film, ethnography, podcasts, digital essay and more. 

Some of the resources you may find useful for planning your project include:

Some examples of the Trinity College projects presented include:

Course: History 260: The Struggle for Civil Rights (Instructor: Cheryl Greenberg)
Project: Mapping the civil rights movement in Marks, Mississippi
Key Concept: Empower student engagement through a visual historical narrative
Presenter: Cheryl Cape, Educational Technology

Course: Art History 227: Public Art (Instructor: Alden Gordon)
Project: Documentation of public art and curation of thematic walking tours in Hartford
Key Concept: Transform student research into a “public good”
Presenter: Sue Denning, Educational Technology

Course: Data Visualization internship seminar, http://commons.trincoll.edu/dataviz
Project: Data Visualization for All, free online book and course, http://DataVizForAll.org
Key Concept: Tell your story on the web with free and easy-to-learn chart and map tools
Presenter: Jack Dougherty, Educational Studies

Course: Psychology 339: Developmental Psychopathology (Instructor: Molly Helt)
Project: Digital Public Service Announcements (PSA) to deliver a “core message”, Bullying PSA
Key Concept: Use multimedia to deliver stories with an impact
Presenters: David Tatem, Educational Technology, and Shannon McAvoy, ’16 and Danielle Rock, ‘16

As always the Educational Technology staff would be happy to work with you in developing and implementing a project with your students so come to us with your ideas and let’s collaborate!

ToW: Adding Kanopy and Films on Demand clips to Moodle

Tip of the WeekThe library subscribes to streaming video collections that provide Trinity College users access to a variety of films. Two of the larger collections are  Kanopy and Films on Demand. Both collections allow users to create clips or shorter segments of films and link to or embed  them into Websites such as Moodle. 

Kanopy is a rich archive of feature films and documentaries from well-known producers and indie filmmakers, including the Criterion Collection. Kanopy provides instructions for creating clips on this page, and allows you to embed clips, playlists, and/or entire films into Moodle. You can also simply grab the direct link to the playlist, instead of embedding. 

Films on Demand is a collection of documentaries on a variety of topics, ranging from modern healthcare policy debates to art to archival newsreel video. Easy steps to create custom segments are found on this page. Like Kanopy, playlists and segments can be embedded into Moodle.

If you have any questions about these collections or using them in class or in Moodle, please get in touch with Amy Harrell, Educational Technology Librarian, amy.harrell@trincoll.edu

 

 

ToW: Protecting Your Digital Identity

Are you interested in protecting your digitTip of the Weekal identity? Doing so not only provides a layer of protection from online harassment, but also promotes positive data practices. To do so, visit the Center for Solutions to Online Violence and follow their guide on locking down your digital identity. Some helpful tips they recommend include the following:

This simple step will make it much more challenging for anyone to log-into your accounts. This also is a great way to ensure that your account is not accessible on devices where you have logged in previously (just make sure you always log out of your accounts!)

Another great tip is to assess what information is freely available about you online:

If you are interested in using the programs listed above, you can visit them at Pipl, Zaba, and Spokeo. Although these tools cannot remove all information that is available about you from the web, they can give you a better idea of what information is available and give you strategies for limiting its pervasiveness.

ToW: New Assignment Feedback and Annotation Tool

Tip of the Week

Over the summer Moodle was upgraded to the latest release which includes a few new features. One of the more useful features is the addition of a reviewing panel  for giving feedback on assignments. When you grade an assignment that was submitted as a Word doc, PDF, or the online text option you will have the ability to add feedback and annotate the document right in the grading interface – no need to open or download the files first. You can add text notes, highlighting, or draw shapes on the document. This can be much faster than downloading Word files to add comments then re loading them to give the students feedback.

If you give feedback on assignments submitted in Moodle this tool should be a great time saver for you. More information on this feature can be found in the Moodle documentation at https://docs.moodle.org/33/en/Using_Assignment#Annotating_submissions.

 

 

ToW: Add course materials to Moodle from the new Library OneSearch

Tip of the WeekThe Library’s new OneSearch offers fast and easy access to library books, articles, films, audio, and more. Many of these materials are available online so that your students can access them directly from any of their devices. 

With OneSearch, it’s easy to build course reading and play lists by grabbing the permanent URL for items you find and pasting them into Moodle. 

 

To get started, go to the Library home page and enter your search term(s) in the OneSearch box: 

 

On the results page, you will want to sign in to be sure you are seeing all of your options. Also note the various ways you can filter your results on the left side of the page: by Library, article type, material type (video, audio, book, article), etc. 

 

When you click on the title of an item, you’ll see additional details. Click the Permalink button to reveal the permanent URL, and then “Copy the permalink to clipboard,” which will allow you to paste the link into your Moodle course. 

Voilà! 

TOW: Get organized with Evernote

Tip of the WeekEvernote is a free productivity tool that allows you to gather all of those scraps of paper, to-do lists, Web clippings, notes, etc. and put them in one, searchable online notebook. Notes can be organized by tags, and are stored on the Web, so they will sync between all your devices.

You can easily share your notes with others: students, faculty, colleagues at other institutions, and invite them to collaborate on documents if you wish.

Potential uses:

  • Collect research notes as you discover articles or Web sites. Evernote will let you take a snapshot of the Web site, file it in a particular notebook, and make a comment for your future reference.
  • Store ideas and reminders related to your courses.
  • Take notes during meetings. You can even take a photo of an item and upload it to Evernote directly.
  • Develop collaborative documents with colleagues from other institutions.
  • Make vacation plans!

Here are some other ideas for using Evernote academically, from Raul Pacheco-Vega.

Proceed to Evernote.com to get started.

TOW: Using Qualtrics for Survey Research

Tip of the Week

There are many ways to field a survey online including free services such as Google Forms and Survey Monkey. But what if your survey requires some complex logic or you need to track participants and automate the process of sending reminders and follow up emails? Trinity College has a subscription with Qualtrics, a powerful and flexible survey tool used by many top researchers. While it does take some getting used to it is easy to use and is powerful and flexible enough for any survey research you can throw at it.

To get started simply go to http://trinity.qualtrics.com and create an account using your Trinity email address. You will then have access to a sandbox area where you can design a survey and see if it is the tool for you. If you decide to use it for your research you should contact your department’s Instructional Technologist and we can help get you started. We will have to fully enable your account before you can activate your survey. To do this we will need some information from you especially proof that you have completed the Institutional Review Board process.