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TOW: Adjusting a grade item in Moodle

Tip of the WeekAre you using Moodle to calculate grades for your class? Do you want to adjust (or curve) a quiz or assignment score after everything has been graded?

This is easy to do in Moodle, but you need to know the settings. First, for grade items added manually, navigate to the settings for the grade item by first going to Gradebook Setup under Course Administration. Under the column labelled ‘Actions,’ select ‘Edit Settings’ in the row of the grade item that you want to change. For Moodle activities, such as assignments, navigate from within the course to the Edit settings page under ‘Assignment Administration.’

Let’s say that you want to adjust the maximum number of points on a 100 point quiz down to 95 (which would raise the percentage scores for each student). On the Grade item screen, you will see a notice that grades have been awarded, so in order to change the maximum grade, you must choose whether to rescale the grades.

The ‘Rescale existing grades’ setting has two options – Yes or No. Selecting Yes means that the existing grades will be rescaled so that the percentage grades remains the same. Selecting No means that the percentage will be recalculated to reflect the new maximum – which is what you want. After you set ‘Rescale existing grades’ to No, the maximum grade box will be activated, and you will be able to enter in a new value. Click on ‘Save changes’ at the bottom of the screen, and you are all done.

If you have any additional questions about the Moodle Gradebook, contact your Instructional Technologist!

TOW: Using Twitter Archiving Google Sheets (TAGS)

Have you ever wanted to see how many people are tweeting about #NetNeutrality? Or do you want to look through tweets from the 2016 Presidential campaign to see how media covered the election? If you’re interested in scraping data from Twitter, consider using Twitter Archiving Google Sheets (TAGS) a program that collects tweets in a Google spreadsheet–making the tweets easy to analyze and visualize using digital tools.

Here is a brief instructional video to get you started:

Once you have enabled TAGS, your data will appear in a spreadsheet like the one below. This sheet will tell you who tweeted, what they tweeted, and when the tweet was posted. All of this information will allow you to trace a hashtag from beginning to end, to see what topics were most debated, and to determine who participated most. Such data can enrich our understandings of the reach of information and activism on Twitter. You can even make searchable location map of the top tweeters in your data set.

TAGS is a great tool to use to research prevalent social issues and an excellent way for students to gain a richer understanding of both their social media presence and their digital skills.

If you’re interested in using TAGS but don’t know how to get started, feel free to contact Educational Technology to get started!

Digital Storytelling Resources

Tip of the WeekIn the Spring of 2017 The Community Learning Initiative offered a workshop on digital storytelling for community learning which was facilitated by Brianna Derr, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship Specialist for Video at Bucknell University. Brianna’s Digital Flavor site contains a wealth of information on digital storytelling projects including example projects, assignments, syllabi and many other resources. 

The site provides details on many assignments and types of projects including documentary film, ethnography, podcasts, digital essay and more. 

Some of the resources you may find useful for planning your project include:

Some examples of the Trinity College projects presented include:

Course: History 260: The Struggle for Civil Rights (Instructor: Cheryl Greenberg)
Project: Mapping the civil rights movement in Marks, Mississippi
Key Concept: Empower student engagement through a visual historical narrative
Presenter: Cheryl Cape, Educational Technology

Course: Art History 227: Public Art (Instructor: Alden Gordon)
Project: Documentation of public art and curation of thematic walking tours in Hartford
Key Concept: Transform student research into a “public good”
Presenter: Sue Denning, Educational Technology

Course: Data Visualization internship seminar, http://commons.trincoll.edu/dataviz
Project: Data Visualization for All, free online book and course, http://DataVizForAll.org
Key Concept: Tell your story on the web with free and easy-to-learn chart and map tools
Presenter: Jack Dougherty, Educational Studies

Course: Psychology 339: Developmental Psychopathology (Instructor: Molly Helt)
Project: Digital Public Service Announcements (PSA) to deliver a “core message”, Bullying PSA
Key Concept: Use multimedia to deliver stories with an impact
Presenters: David Tatem, Educational Technology, and Shannon McAvoy, ’16 and Danielle Rock, ‘16

As always the Educational Technology staff would be happy to work with you in developing and implementing a project with your students so come to us with your ideas and let’s collaborate!

ToW: Adding Kanopy and Films on Demand clips to Moodle

Tip of the WeekThe library subscribes to streaming video collections that provide Trinity College users access to a variety of films. Two of the larger collections are  Kanopy and Films on Demand. Both collections allow users to create clips or shorter segments of films and link to or embed  them into Websites such as Moodle. 

Kanopy is a rich archive of feature films and documentaries from well-known producers and indie filmmakers, including the Criterion Collection. Kanopy provides instructions for creating clips on this page, and allows you to embed clips, playlists, and/or entire films into Moodle. You can also simply grab the direct link to the playlist, instead of embedding. 

Films on Demand is a collection of documentaries on a variety of topics, ranging from modern healthcare policy debates to art to archival newsreel video. Easy steps to create custom segments are found on this page. Like Kanopy, playlists and segments can be embedded into Moodle.

If you have any questions about these collections or using them in class or in Moodle, please get in touch with Amy Harrell, Educational Technology Librarian, amy.harrell@trincoll.edu

 

 

Join Our Team:
We’re Hiring an Instructional Technologist

instructional technology

Trinity College is hiring an instructional technologist this fall. (It’s a replacement position*, not an expansion of the group.)

While the ad speaks for itself to some extent, I did want to highlight some other reasons why this is a good moment to join us.

The college has made significant investments recently in the educational technology group, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future:

  • We’re now a Domain of One’s Own campus, with a pilot currently underway and a more formal rollout slated for the spring.
  • With the help of a donor and some of our own money, we’ve been investigating emerging technologies such as 3D printing (available to the campus for free), virtual reality machines, and drones. One of the instructional technologists has been leading a working group to get a policy approved for the campus, and has helped kick-start a student drone club.
  • The college has just added a digital scholarship coordinator, Christina Boyles, and is building a Digital Scholarship Studio, which will come online in January. This will add two learning spaces, a recording studio, an imaging room, and a couple of meeting rooms to the usable space of the library.
  • Educational Technology is housed in a newly-redesigned space that supports collaborative student work as well as innovative technological pedagogy.
  • We’re doing a lot of cool projects–we were part of the #prmapathon for Puerto Rico a couple of weeks back, and are launching a physical computing working group this fall. We support a portfolio program that we expect to grow over the next couple of years.
  • We develop courses for edX, and have some more very exciting courses in the pipeline.
  • Instructional technologists have freedom to teach, both in the form of workshops but also in Trinity’s J-Term program (one instructional technologist, Cheryl Cape, is team-teaching a course on modeling financial data in our Bloomberg lab; the other, Dave Tatem, is team-teaching a course on drones and mapping) and interdisciplinary courses in research methods.
  • I take professional development seriously as a manager, and send people to conferences and help them make presentations and publish articles.

Over the past couple of years, we have laid the groundwork for some major developments in educational technology and digital scholarship, and they are starting to bear fruit. We welcome applications for the position, ideally before Thanksgiving; in the meantime, if I can provide any helpful information about Trinity or about our group, please don’t hesitate to be in touch!

*The person who’s leaving is going to an instructional design job at a startup in Brooklyn.

Photo “OG Instructional Technology” by Flickr user Tom Woodward / Creative Commons licensed BY-NC-2.0

ToW: Protecting Your Digital Identity

Are you interested in protecting your digitTip of the Weekal identity? Doing so not only provides a layer of protection from online harassment, but also promotes positive data practices. To do so, visit the Center for Solutions to Online Violence and follow their guide on locking down your digital identity. Some helpful tips they recommend include the following:

This simple step will make it much more challenging for anyone to log-into your accounts. This also is a great way to ensure that your account is not accessible on devices where you have logged in previously (just make sure you always log out of your accounts!)

Another great tip is to assess what information is freely available about you online:

If you are interested in using the programs listed above, you can visit them at Pipl, Zaba, and Spokeo. Although these tools cannot remove all information that is available about you from the web, they can give you a better idea of what information is available and give you strategies for limiting its pervasiveness.

Mapathon for Puerto Rico: THIS FRIDAY (9/29) from 2pm-5pm

Screenshot of OpenStreetMap

Please join us this Friday (9/29) from 2pm-5pm in the Blume Lab (LITC 119) for a mapathon for Puerto Rico for hurricane relief.

Come help with relief efforts on the ground in Puerto Rico by contributing your time to open-source mapping.

Following the recent hurricane, people around the world are using the OpenStreetMap platform to give their time to hurricane relief efforts. The Red Cross in Puerto Rico has identified two tasks we can help with that would contribute to their efforts. During the mapathon, we will teach people how to help with these efforts through mapping, and we will map together. We’ll be participating with people at several other schools, including Columbia University’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities & Columbia University Libraries.

No prior experience with mapping or with open source efforts is necessary. No knowledge of local terrain in Puerto Rico is necessary. Come at any time during the afternoon. (We’ll have light snacks.)

If you have any questions, please contact Christina Boyles (christina.boyles@trincoll.edu) or Jason B. Jones (jason.jones@trincoll.edu).

Here is a printable version of the flyer:

Download (PDF, 335KB)

We will be editing in OpenStreetMap, a project that aims to make geographic data freely accessible. Christina has pulled together a handout of how to edit in OpenStreetMap, which you can consult here:

Download (PDF, 720KB)

ToW: New Assignment Feedback and Annotation Tool

Tip of the Week

Over the summer Moodle was upgraded to the latest release which includes a few new features. One of the more useful features is the addition of a reviewing panel  for giving feedback on assignments. When you grade an assignment that was submitted as a Word doc, PDF, or the online text option you will have the ability to add feedback and annotate the document right in the grading interface – no need to open or download the files first. You can add text notes, highlighting, or draw shapes on the document. This can be much faster than downloading Word files to add comments then re loading them to give the students feedback.

If you give feedback on assignments submitted in Moodle this tool should be a great time saver for you. More information on this feature can be found in the Moodle documentation at https://docs.moodle.org/33/en/Using_Assignment#Annotating_submissions.

 

 

TOW: Our STAs are here to help your students!

Thinking of a digital storytelling project?Tip of the Week
Want to have your students create a short video for the class?
Interested in a class blog?

The Student Technology Assistants are here to help faculty and students with your class projects.  Just a few of the things we can help with:

  • WordPress
  • Multimedia projects using iMovie and Audacity
  • Photoshop and storyboarding
  • PowerPoint presentations and posters
  • 3D printing

In addition, they can help with other instructional software, such as Moodle, PowerPoint, and charts and graphs in Excel.

The STAs are available MTWTH, 8 am – 8 pm, Friday, 8 am – 6 pm, and Sunday, noon – 8 pm, in the new Center for Educational Technology on Level 1 of Raether Library. You can also call (860-297-2589), email (sta-help@trincoll.edu) or make an appointment online. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

ToW: Moodle Docs for this page provides contextual help

While our Moodle Resource Center should be your first stop for common Moodle issues and Trinity-specific help, the Moodle platform provides a link to more detailed documentation at the bottom of every page.

Just scroll ALLllllllllll the way down to the bottom of the screen, and you will see a link that says “Moodle Docs for this page.” 

Moodle Docs for this page

The best part about this link is that it will take you to documentation for the specific type of tool you are using. So if you’re setting up the Assignment tool, the link will take you directly to the documentation for the Assignment tool.

Full details about all the settings for every tool can be found in the Moodle Docs. This information can be a little overwhelming, but if you’re having trouble with the many options and settings Moodle offers for every tool, this can be a helpful place to start (I use it all the time – in fact, most of the time when you call me with a tricky Moodle question, I’m using this tool to find the answers you need).

*Please keep in mind that not all the of the settings and tools mentioned in the general Moodle Docs are always available on our Trinity instance of Moodle.