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ToW: Protecting Your Digital Identity

Are you interested in protecting your digitTip of the Weekal identity? Doing so not only provides a layer of protection from online harassment, but also promotes positive data practices. To do so, visit the Center for Solutions to Online Violence and follow their guide on locking down your digital identity. Some helpful tips they recommend include the following:

This simple step will make it much more challenging for anyone to log-into your accounts. This also is a great way to ensure that your account is not accessible on devices where you have logged in previously (just make sure you always log out of your accounts!)

Another great tip is to assess what information is freely available about you online:

If you are interested in using the programs listed above, you can visit them at Pipl, Zaba, and Spokeo. Although these tools cannot remove all information that is available about you from the web, they can give you a better idea of what information is available and give you strategies for limiting its pervasiveness.

Mapathon for Puerto Rico: THIS FRIDAY (9/29) from 2pm-5pm

Screenshot of OpenStreetMap

Please join us this Friday (9/29) from 2pm-5pm in the Blume Lab (LITC 119) for a mapathon for Puerto Rico for hurricane relief.

Come help with relief efforts on the ground in Puerto Rico by contributing your time to open-source mapping.

Following the recent hurricane, people around the world are using the OpenStreetMap platform to give their time to hurricane relief efforts. The Red Cross in Puerto Rico has identified two tasks we can help with that would contribute to their efforts. During the mapathon, we will teach people how to help with these efforts through mapping, and we will map together. We’ll be participating with people at several other schools, including Columbia University’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities & Columbia University Libraries.

No prior experience with mapping or with open source efforts is necessary. No knowledge of local terrain in Puerto Rico is necessary. Come at any time during the afternoon. (We’ll have light snacks.)

If you have any questions, please contact Christina Boyles ( or Jason B. Jones (

Here is a printable version of the flyer:

Download (PDF, 335KB)

We will be editing in OpenStreetMap, a project that aims to make geographic data freely accessible. Christina has pulled together a handout of how to edit in OpenStreetMap, which you can consult here:

Download (PDF, 720KB)

ToW: New Assignment Feedback and Annotation Tool

Tip of the Week

Over the summer Moodle was upgraded to the latest release which includes a few new features. One of the more useful features is the addition of a reviewing panel  for giving feedback on assignments. When you grade an assignment that was submitted as a Word doc, PDF, or the online text option you will have the ability to add feedback and annotate the document right in the grading interface – no need to open or download the files first. You can add text notes, highlighting, or draw shapes on the document. This can be much faster than downloading Word files to add comments then re loading them to give the students feedback.

If you give feedback on assignments submitted in Moodle this tool should be a great time saver for you. More information on this feature can be found in the Moodle documentation at



TOW: Our STAs are here to help your students!

Thinking of a digital storytelling project?Tip of the Week
Want to have your students create a short video for the class?
Interested in a class blog?

The Student Technology Assistants are here to help faculty and students with your class projects.  Just a few of the things we can help with:

  • WordPress
  • Multimedia projects using iMovie and Audacity
  • Photoshop and storyboarding
  • PowerPoint presentations and posters
  • 3D printing

In addition, they can help with other instructional software, such as Moodle, PowerPoint, and charts and graphs in Excel.

The STAs are available MTWTH, 8 am – 8 pm, Friday, 8 am – 6 pm, and Sunday, noon – 8 pm, in the new Center for Educational Technology on Level 1 of Raether Library. You can also call (860-297-2589), email ( or make an appointment online. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

ToW: Moodle Docs for this page provides contextual help

While our Moodle Resource Center should be your first stop for common Moodle issues and Trinity-specific help, the Moodle platform provides a link to more detailed documentation at the bottom of every page.

Just scroll ALLllllllllll the way down to the bottom of the screen, and you will see a link that says “Moodle Docs for this page.” 

Moodle Docs for this page

The best part about this link is that it will take you to documentation for the specific type of tool you are using. So if you’re setting up the Assignment tool, the link will take you directly to the documentation for the Assignment tool.

Full details about all the settings for every tool can be found in the Moodle Docs. This information can be a little overwhelming, but if you’re having trouble with the many options and settings Moodle offers for every tool, this can be a helpful place to start (I use it all the time – in fact, most of the time when you call me with a tricky Moodle question, I’m using this tool to find the answers you need).

*Please keep in mind that not all the of the settings and tools mentioned in the general Moodle Docs are always available on our Trinity instance of Moodle.

ToW: Add course materials to Moodle from the new Library OneSearch

Tip of the WeekThe Library’s new OneSearch offers fast and easy access to library books, articles, films, audio, and more. Many of these materials are available online so that your students can access them directly from any of their devices. 

With OneSearch, it’s easy to build course reading and play lists by grabbing the permanent URL for items you find and pasting them into Moodle. 


To get started, go to the Library home page and enter your search term(s) in the OneSearch box: 


On the results page, you will want to sign in to be sure you are seeing all of your options. Also note the various ways you can filter your results on the left side of the page: by Library, article type, material type (video, audio, book, article), etc. 


When you click on the title of an item, you’ll see additional details. Click the Permalink button to reveal the permanent URL, and then “Copy the permalink to clipboard,” which will allow you to paste the link into your Moodle course. 


ToW: Make Everything More Accessible with SensusAccess

Tip of the Week Keeping up with reading is a critical part of college success, and so making sure course materials are available in a variety of accessible formats is important. For example, some faculty and students with low vision use screen readers to navigate the web and read documents. Others need documents in Braille. Anyone can require accommodations at different points–for example, students with concussion often can’t look at a screen, but need to be able to keep up with coursework.

To respond to this need, Trinity has subscribed to a software service called SensusAccess, which converts files from less accessible formats into more accessible ones. To take only the handiest example: SensusAccess can take a PDF document, even a basic one made by a copy machine, and turn it into an MP3, an e-book, a plain text file, or even just a PDF with semantic tags that allow a screen reader to better describe the content. It can also take a batch of text and give you an accessible version, or convert a web page.

SensusAccess is available to anyone with a Trinity email address. Just go to the main SensusAccess page, identify the kind of material you want to convert, and follow the on-screen instructions. After you’re done, you’ll get an email indicating the file is ready. One of the great things about the service is that it’s self-contained, so anyone can request a file be converted at any time–there’s no need to wait for business hours.

If you have any questions about working with SensusAccess, please don’t hesitate to contact anyone in Educational Technology!

Summer changes for the Educational Technology site

Over the next few weeks, we will be making some edits to this site’s content structure and design. Changes will be rolled out gradually, so that by early July we should have a newly refreshed site. 

We hope that the new structure will make things even easier to find, but if the information you seek remains elusive, please feel free to contact your Instructional Technologist! 

Looking back at #Domains17

Trinity Ed Tech folks at #Domains17


This week, most of the educational technology group went to Oklahoma City for the Domains 2017 conference, jointly hosted by Reclaim Hosting and the University of Oklahoma.

We went because we are quite close to setting up a pilot instance of Trinity Domains, a Domain of One’s Own project (see also: A Domain of One’s Own in a Post-Ownership Society) that will give faculty, students, and staff the digital infrastructure to stake out their digital identity and develop new, exciting forms of scholarship. Since setup is imminent, the conference seemed like a good way to see what other schools were doing, and to make connections for when we inevitably need help.

We’re launching the project because we want to be able to support as much open, web-based teaching, learning, and scholarship as possible, in as many forms as possible, and we want to make it as easy as possible for people to experiment online.

I don’t think any of us at Trinity were well-positioned to do a proper “review” of #Domains17, as we don’t yet have access to the Domain of One’s Own setup, and so don’t have fingertip knowledge of what’s easy, what’s hard, or anything like that.

In lieu of that review, then, here’re a few thoughts:

  • #Domains17 was a great short-conference experience, at an interesting venue and with lots of very friendly, collaboration-minded people. Lauren Brumfield, Adam Croom, Jim Groom, and everyone associated with the conference deserve a lot of credit. 13/10, would attend another event.
  • Martha Burtis’s keynote, “Neither Locked Out Nor Locked In,” is a really great starting point for thinking tangibly about some of the reasons one might want to pursue a Domains project.
  • It also primed me with a thought that held up very well throughout the conference: Her entire section on “WordPress as Symbol and Choice” decries the fact that WordPress often becomes the default way to inhabit a domain of one’s own, which is . . . problematic. Students and faculty need to be free to have domains with different technology options, even if we all have to stretch a bit in terms of what we support, and what people have to support on their own a little bit.
  • Once you’d heard that talk from Martha, it was hard not to realize that the conference schedule was quite WordPress focused. There were more examples of “here’s how to do a cool thing in WordPress” than there were examples of “here’s a successful instructional use of Domains.” This is neither good nor bad as such, but it was just interesting to see the lay of the land. Since we have two multisite WordPress installations on campus, the temptation to default to WordPress will be something to both resist and work with.
  • Switching gears a little: On a personal note it was neat to see Jon Udell talk about annotation. It’s probably not the thing he’d pick to be known for, but I’ve shown his screencast on Wikipedia & the heavy metal umlaut to thousands of people over the years.

There will be more thoughts on this over the summer—and I’d certainly invite Amy and Dave and Sue to chime in with their impressions—as we get started. Certainly it’s the case that I jotted down a ton of things to look into as soon as we’re up and running, which I hope to be able to report on soon!

Photo with all four of us by Tom Woodward, shared under a Creative Commons-BY-SA-2.0 license

Summer Virtual Reading Group

medieval marginalia
As discussed at SITT this year, we’d like to use this summer as a way to collaboratively read a few essays about digital pedagogy and research.

To play along, make sure you have an account with, and, ideally, install the extension for Chrome. (You don’t have to use Chrome–you can also annotate things using the website.) The explanatory video is pretty good:

Once you’ve signed up, go here to join the Trinity Ed Tech group:

Then, let’s start reading! We’ll start with’s overview of the A Domain of One’s Own movement, which we’re piloting here at Trinity beginning this fall. For the best effectiveness, try to post comments to the group before June 9.

Our second reading will be Natalie Houston’s essay on Text Analysis–we’ll try to comment on that between June 10 and June 23.

We’ll determine subsequent readings later in the summer.

Photo “2 chickens, a duck, and a priest?” by Flicker user Aria Nadii / Creative Commons licensed BY-NC-ND-2.0