Electrophysiologic Response to Classical Music in Instrumentalists, Vocalists and Non-Musicians

Brielle McDonald ’20 and Prof. Lloyd

4 thoughts on “Electrophysiologic Response to Classical Music in Instrumentalists, Vocalists and Non-Musicians

  1. I really enjoyed reading about how different types of classical music can have varying effects on brain activation due to an individual’s expertise and musical background. Your poster is very well organized, easy to follow, and I enjoy the layout of the figures!

    Is there any insight into why the F3, F1, FZ, FC3, and FC1 brain areas showed the greatest electrical activity for each participant? What is this area of the brain responsible for? Great job overall!

  2. Great job on your research presentation. I have a question regarding the electrical activity that was produced under these different musical conditions. My question is can a correlation be drawn between these different electrical activities and their enhancement on memory within the individuals that had a strong musical background compared to those that did not? Or is this question related to something else altogether?

  3. Learning about the association between type of musical expertise and brain activity was very interesting. After all the Monday lab meeting updates, I’m your final poster turned out so organized, concise, and informative! Perhaps you could take this study further and investigate the response to different genres of music.

  4. Learning about the association between type of musical expertise and brain activity was very interesting. After all the Monday lab meeting updates, I’m your final poster turned out so organized, concise, and informative! Perhaps you could take this study further and investigate the response to different genres of music.

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