Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut

Author: Amy Harrell (Page 1 of 21)

Digital Projects Librarian, Trinity College library

Environmental Justice in Connecticut

SmokestackPlease join us on October 20 for a talk by Hartford advocate Sharon Lewis, Executive Director of the CT Coalition for Environmental and Economic Justice. Sharon will speak about how environmental policy decisions disproportionately harm CT’s BIPOC and poor communities, and how this systemic racism means our already vulnerable populations are unfairly burdened by the effects of accelerating climate change. Sharon will teach us about these ongoing inequities and how you can be part of the solution.

When: Thursday, October 20th from 12:15 – 1:15
Where: Engelhard Reading Room on Level 1 of the Raether LITC
A sustainable to-go lunch will be provided. Please bring a reusable water bottle and/or coffee mug for beverages.

Sharon Lewis is the recipient of the EPA’s 2022 Environmental Merit Award. As the Executive Director of the Coalition for Environmental and Economic Justice (CCEEJ), she leads a statewide coalition of diverse organizations that share the vision of abolishing the systemic and institutionalized rules, policies, and laws that give rise to unequal environmental burdens borne by low-income and people of color.  Sharon was instrumental in developing the “Citizen’s Guide to the Permitting Process,” a curriculum that taught state agencies to better communicate with those in Environmental Justice Communities. This became the cornerstone of CT’s 2009 Environmental Justice Law.  Sharon currently serves on numerous statewide committees and coalitions, and promotes a Zero Waste economy as key strategy to help ensure the human right to clean air, water, and lands.

This talk is inspired by the 2022 International Open Access Week theme, Open for Climate Justice. When pursued in an inclusive manner, Open Access publishing systems “can create pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and serve as a means to address the inequities that shape the impacts of climate change and our response to them.”

Sponsored by the LITS Libraries & Digital Learning department.

 

Photo by veeterzy on Unsplash

JumpStart 2022

Faculty: Please join us  for JumpStart, Wednesday, August 24, 10am – 2pm in the Raether Center for Educational Technology. This event is designed to help you — and your syllabus — get ready for the fall semester. Join drop-in sessions with librarians and instructional technologists on FAQs like using Moodle, building research assignments, teaching with primary sources, and designing digital projects.

Event details

Please note: Masks are required for this event.

Library Tours will be available on the hour at 11:00, 12:00, and 1:00.

Drop in to ask questions in the following areas between 10:00 – 2:00. You can also meet with your library and instructional liaisons in one-on-one appointments. Can’t make JumpStart? Make an appointment with one of us.

Get up and running with Moodle Blume lab, room 119
Digital Scholarship: Inspiration and techniques FAQ page Digital scholarship lab, room 181
Primary sources and class visits to Watkinson Seminar room 103
Research Librarians Study room 113
Web archiving, digitizing Study room 116
Library collections FAQ page Front table in Center for Educational Technology

Feel free to join us whenever your schedule allows, or stay for the full session. Morning coffee/pastries and to-go lunches provided.

Publishing Beyond Print: A Conversation on the Possibilities of Open Access Books

In celebration of Open Access Week, please join the Library for a panel discussion on Open Access (OA) monographs, a publishing model that can help scholarship find a wider audience.

While OA journals have been widely adopted by the academic publishing system, OA monographs are less common and have only recently found substantial support through initiatives such as Knowledge UnlatchedLever Press, MIT Press Open, and TOME. Book authors Jack Dougherty, Stefanie Chambers, and Alyson Spurgas have each experienced the publication of an Open Access book in different ways. They will discuss how they arrived at Open Access publishing, and how it has been different than print. Katie Bauer, Director of Collections, Discovery, & Access Services, will then lead a discussion around how Library collections budgets can potentially support Open Access monograph publishing.

October 28: 12:15 – 1:15pm Zoom

Watch the recording

Open Access Books to be discussed:

 

Navigating the Scholarly Publishing Landscape: A Conversation on developing your research identity and impact

This fall, LITS is hosting a series of Common Hour conversations for faculty on building scholarly identity on the Web. As a faculty author, how do you balance making your work widely available with protecting it? How do you want to present yourself through profiles or social media? What is the best way to feature your publications? 

Please join us for any or all of the following sessions, all virtual: 

November 2, 12:15 – 1:15 Managing Your Online Presence: Shaping Your Scholarly Identity Through Formal and Social Networks 

We will discuss building scholarly profiles, managing different types of author identifiers, and choosing where to build your presence. We will also facilitate a conversation around engaging with social media as an academic. Would social media participation boost your visibility, and if so, which platforms might be relevant for your discipline? What are the downsides? At the end of this hour, you will have learned to better define your identity as a scholar on the Web. 

Register for this workshop. 

November 9, 12:15 – 1:15 Knowing Your Rights and Options as an Author 

What choices do you make as an author and a consumer? In this hour, we will discuss copyright and Intellectual Property,  using an author addendum for contracts, Open Access, and repository options for your work.  

Register for this workshop. 

December 7, 12:15 – 1:15 Collaborating with the Public 

How do you want the public to engage your work? In this session, we’ll talk about different strategies for sharing your work with the public and requesting meaningful feedback or interactions. This may include the creation and use of digital community archives on a project site, citizen science projects,  social media posts that invite public response on your research, hosting “live” conversations on facebook or instagram, etc.  

Register for this workshop. 

Questions? Contact facilitators Amy Harrell or Mary Mahoney.

Seniors: Thesis Carrel Information

A limited number of study carrels (with lockers) on Level 3 can be reserved for one academic year by senior thesis writers. Thesis Carrels are given out on a first-come, first-served basis to current Senior Thesis writers in the beginning of each fall term.

Study carrels without attached lockers may not be reserved, officially or unofficially, by any student.

The Thesis Carrel application for the 2021-2022 academic year will go live on Wednesday, September 22nd, 2021 at 7AM. When the application is live, you may click here to apply for a Thesis Carrel.

Welcome Kristen Eshleman!

Kristen EshlemanLITS welcomes Kristen Eshleman as Trinity’s new Vice President for Library and Information Technology Services (LITS). Kristen will provide leadership of our merged LITS organization, and collaborate with fellow cabinet members and the President, as well as with faculty, staff, and students, to advance our strategic goals. 

Kristen joins us from Davidson College in North Carolina, where she has worked for 20 years in roles related to academic technology and digital learning. Most recently she has spent the last two years as Director of Innovation Initiatives, in which she was responsible for operational leadership of innovation strategy, process, and projects for the college. 

See the official campus announcement for additional information about Kristen. She can be reached at kristen.eshleman@trincoll.edu. 

Seniors: Upload your thesis or capstone project to the Digital Repository

Preserve and share your hard work!

  • Upload your thesis or senior project
    The Digital Repository is Trinity’s online archive and can accept theses, multimedia projects, images, posters, and more.
  • Share with others
    Your thesis or project will be discovered by Google and other research tools, and you’ll get statistics on who is reading your work. A permanent link can be included on applications, resumes, LinkedIn, etc.
  • Retain copyright
    When you submit your work to the Repository you retain all copyrights and you choose what to share and under what conditions. You can restrict download access to the Trinity campus if desired.
  • Get started
    Go to the Digital Repository and read our submission guidelines to get started. Please contact Amy Harrell (amy.harrell@trincoll.edu) with any questions.

Library & IT survey – Chance to win an iPad Mini

Students: Library and Information Technology Services (LITS) needs your help in fine-tuning our new website (check out our new site at https://www.trincoll.edu/lits/). Your feedback will help us make sure it is user-friendly and easy to navigate for students at Trinity.

Providing feedback is easy. Just go through this brief online questionnaire, which asks you a series of questions about where you would click in order to find something on the new website.

At the end of the questionnaire you can also indicate if you are interested in answering some additional questions in a one-on-one Zoom meeting with an LITS staffperson. Participation in one of these sessions earns a $5 Peter B’s Gift Card.

Everyone who completes a questionnaire is entered into a randomized drawing for an iPad Mini!

For questions, please contact Amy Harrell, amy.harrell@trincoll.edu. The questionnaire closes on April 9.

Take the questionnaire

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