Author: kbauer (Page 3 of 4)

Streaming Movie Options Swank

Citizen Kane poster

Be sure to check out movie titles available for classroom use from Swank. The Library licensed Swank content because we often have requests for feature films or TV shows not covered in our other resources Kanopy and Films on Demand. This week Swank is highlighting material from HBO like

We only pay for Swank movies that we request and turn on in their interface. If you see a title in Swank that you want to use for a course just send email to Kim Rinaldo at kimberly.rinaldo@trincoll.edu know and we’ll have Swank turn that on for Trinity access.

Trinity Library Exploring Alternatives for Institutional Repository

Beprexit logo, project of the UPenn Libraries

Beprexit

The Trinity Digital Repository is an open access resource for papers written by Trinity faculty and students, materials from the Trinity libraries, and Trinity publications. It is open to anyone, anywhere in the world. Making material freely available fits perfectly with the mission of the library, and supporting it has been important to staff. Open access material also helps raise the visibility of Trinity publications, as you can see in the list of popular downloads. We have always hosted the repository with a company called Bepress, which was a small independent start up when Trinity started working with them. This year Bepress was purchased by the publishing giant Elsevier, causing great angst among the library community active in institutional repositories and open access initiatives. This was recently expressed by the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, who announced their Beprexit project to find an alternative to Bepress. Like University of Pennsylvania and many other institutions, Trinity is looking at alternatives to Bepress now that it is owned by Elsevier.

I’m not completely an Elsevier critic. They provide high-quality access to a large body of scholarly work, and we license a lot of highly-used digital content from them. Elsevier is also very expensive, and they have a deserved reputation for purchasing many smaller publishers and affiliated service companies, giving rise to concerns about a monopoly, or something close to a monopoly. There are a few other big publishers, such as Kluwer, but there are far less publishers than when I started in the library profession.

To be fair to Elsevier they also have a history of supporting some open access initiatives, for example, the Hinari project. Through Hinari,  a program run by the WHO, Elsevier makes medical journals available to low and middle-income countries. They also have made no move they libraries have seen to shut down or put new conditions on Bepress repositories. Still, the move by Elsevier to take over Bepress is unsettling to say the least.  It isn’t entire clear why Elsevier purchased Bepress, but they have been very active in purchasing other platforms and citation tools like Mendeley aimed at the academic community. There is some thought that Elsevier is seeking to link open access preprints to the publication process. We in the library believe that we need to carefully examine options other than Bepress to host our repository.

The environment for repositories has changed pretty dramatically since we started with Bepress. There are more options available to us, many of which have been developed within the open access/open source community. Over the next few months the library will talk with companies that support DSpace, Islandora,  and Preservica. We’ll also talk with Bepress, since we are not necessarily ready to abandon a platform that has worked well for us. We do need to be concerned with both access and long-term management of our materials. We need a solution that will minimize our costs, and assure us that we can continue to provide access to Trinity materials in a reliable, open, and anonymous way (without intrusive data mining from any external company).

We invite any students or faculty to contact us with comments or concerns as we explore repository options.

OneSearch Workshops

OneSearch, launched this summer helps you easily find library books, articles and other resources including, CTW collections.

We have some tips that will make OneSearch even easier to use. We’ll share them in a series of  20 minute workshops. No registration required!

Drop In Workshops (all in the Phelan Room on the A Level of the Library) October 9, 10 and 11 at 10am, 12pm and 3pm

State Funding for Library Resources Threatened

Connecticut State Library in Hartford

Libraries across Connecticut, including the Trinity Library, benefit from programs run by the Connecticut State Library. Several of our most popular databases, including PsycInfo, ABI Inform, and Proquest Historical Newspapers are funded through the State Library’s ResearchIt CT service.  Historical Newspapers is used widely and offers content back to the 1980’s and sometimes earlier, for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune and thousands of other newspapers. Access to these and other digital resources are provides to all Connecticut libraries–college, university, K-12 and public libraries.

State legislators and the governor have not been able to agree on a fy18 budget, and  since July 1 Connecticut has functioned under Governor Malloy’s Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan, which cuts funding for the State Library 18%. Funds specifically for ResearchIT are cut 50%.

Here are the specifics on the State Library budget under the executive order (ResearchIt funds are State-Wide Digital Library): overall funding is reduced from $9,396,000 by $1,728,000 to $7,668,000 in fy18 and for State-Wide Digital Library funds from $1,768,000 by almost $900,000 to $880,000.

This was nothing new for libraries–every year for the last few years, as part of budget negotiations the spending for the library and its services has been threatened with fairly drastic cuts, but funding has usually been restored at the eleventh hour. Because everyone is used to this there wasn’t too much concern. However, the budget stalemate has gone on for months, and the governor recently vetoed a budget passed by the legislature, which has now brought us to a more difficult situation.

The State Library has let us know that the subscriptions for Proquest Historical Newspapers and ABI Inform expired September 30. Proquest will not turn off access while we await a pricing proposal from them for all Connecticut libraries to keep access to these resources, but they won’t continue that access past December. The State Library and Proquest have said that the total bill will be the basic renewal price Proquest would have charged the State Library, but it is not at all clear how they intend to apportion the bill across all Connecticut libraries, or how all the libraries will manage that access and negotiations going forward.

Trinity College library knows that these resources are important to the community and we intend to fund them. Most libraries in the state will want to continue access as well, but the price may put these resources out of reach for some. Additionally, most libraries have tight budgets, and may not be able to suddenly pick up a large subscription they did not expect (major digital resources can run into the thousands or even tens of thousands.) The situation does underscore that the state budget problems can affect us all in unexpected and unwelcome ways.

More Info

New Library Catalog–Important Dates

In Information Services we’ve been very busy preparing to go live with a new library catalog. It will provide a better search experience and easier ordering of books from CTW, among other improvements. Moving to a new system is a big undertaking for us, and to do it correctly will require us to turn off some services for a short period of time. If we don’t do this some information could be lost when data are migrated from our old to our new system. Here are some key dates we would like you to be aware of:

 

  • June 22, 2017 we will turn off requesting from all the CTW catalogs. You can still check out Trinity books, but you will not be able to request delivery of books from Wesleyan or Connecticut College. CTW book processing will resume after July 5. Please plan ahead and do any CTW ordering before the 22nd. If you have a pressing need for a CTW book during this time we would be glad to either purchase or order them through Interlibrary Loan.

 

  • June 28 we will move to an “offline” circulation system (you shouldn’t notice much difference at the circulation desk) and we’ll turn off the self-checkout machine.

 

  • June 29 we will go live with a new system called Onesearch. You can again request books from CTW, but please be aware that due to the 4th of July holiday and CTW staffing orders will not be processed until July 5.

 

  • July 5 CTW borrowing services will resume.

 

During this time and through July staff will be learning a new system for ordering, processing and checking out books, and we may be a bit slower processing requests than normal. Please let us know right away if you experience any delays, problems or just have a question or comment by sending email to kathleen.bauer@trincoll.edu

Fred Korematsu Honored in Google Doodle

Fred Korematsu, born on this day 1919, defied orders to imprison Americans of Japanese descent during World War II.  His conviction for evading internment was upheld by the US Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States. In dissent, Justice Frank Murphy wrote

All residents of this nation are kin in some way by blood or culture to a foreign land. Yet they are primarily and necessarily a part of the new and distinct civilization of the United States. They must, accordingly, be treated at all times as the heirs of the American experiment, and as entitled to all the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution.

Read about Fred Korematsu in Enduring conviction : Fred Korematsu and his quest for justice online  from the Trinity Library, or one of these other books about Japanese internment.

Enduring Conviction book cover

Enduring Conviction

Tip: Getting the Most Out of Google Scholar

Many of us like to use Google Scholar. It is a good supplement to other library research databases and has convenient links to digital copies of articles. When material is freely available GS will show it automatically, but to see articles that Trinity purchases you need to set up GS correctly.  It’s only a few steps and it pays off in convenience and saved time later.

Configure Google Scholar Settings

Find the Settings link at the top of the page in Google Scholar and select Library Links. Here do a search for Trinity College.

search

 

 

This search will return two matching items to select: Trinity College Library – Online-Trinity College and TRINITY COLLEGE -Proquest Fulltext.

settings

 

I also like to search and select Worldcat. With this option you’ll see if Trinity has a print copy of books found in GS. With these two or three options checked save your selections, and then when you search in GS you’ll see a slightly different display.

Display Changes in Google Scholar

Once you’ve configured GS and do a new search you’ll see additional links displayed for Trinity College licensed digital copies on the right side of the display. The example below shows three citations: in the second PDF is shown for licensed digital content available to the Trinity community. This link is only shown when you’ve configured settings for Trinity content.

 

three cites

 

Other Options

The first citation above has a small More option displayed in the line for citations and related articles. Under More you’ll find another useful function for In print-Trinity College.

more feature

 

Use In print-Trinity College to request that Trinity Library get a copy for you when you cannot find digital content. This request may take a few days for a print copy to be located and scanned for you.

The configuration changes you’ve made will still be there the next time you use the same browser, provide you have cookies turned on. You don’t need to be on the Trinity network, but you will be routed through the proxy server for the Trinity links to full text. These settings should help make Google Scholar even more useful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Books for the Political Season

These books about politics in the U.S. are new to the Trinity library collection:

+-+719046964_70People Get Ready: The Fight Against a Jobless Economy and a Citizenless Democracy by Robert W. McChesney and John Nichols

HC106.84 .M3973 2016

The authors argue that disruptive effects of technology on employment along with the rise of political power of a small number of wealthy individual and corporations have created a “citizenless democracy” where few people feel their vote matters, and that “the essential economic issues of the time are not the essential political issues of the times.”. They call for new thinking to address the problems, such things as revitalized public education, worker cooperatives and shorter work weeks.

Contents: Introduction: welcome to the future — Into the maelstrom — A jobless economy? — Citizenless democracy — Democratic infrastructure — Overcoming the democratic disconnect — A democratic agenda for a digital age — Statistical appendix / R. Jamil Jonna.

 

content Engines of Liberty: The Power of Citizen Activists to Make Constitutional Law by David Cole

KF384 .C65 2016

Contents: The vision — A marathon, not a sprint : Vermont — One step forward, how many back? Massachusetts — A victory lost and regained : California — Losing forward : Maine — The end game : Windsor and Obergefell — One state at a time — Revisionist history — Federal forums — Supreme recognition — People power — “Completely hopeless” — Korematsu’s legacy — At home abroad — Messages and messengers — Transformative transparency — The Obama difference.

 

+-+782944364_70Poison Tea: How Big Oil and Big Tobacco Invented the Tea Party and Captured the GOP by Jeff Nesbit

JK2391.T43 N47 2016

Contents: An Unholy Alliance — The Playbook — A Critical Bridge: Ron Paul and the “Patriot” Movement — Smedley Butler, a Fascist Coup, and the American Liberty League — What Drives Charles Koch? — The Man Behind the Curtain — Why David Koch Never Loses — Tobacco Documents Trail — COFIRE — Enough Is Enough — Allied Forces — CART — Get Government off Our Back — The Tobacco Strategy — A Road Map for Antigovernment Anger — Mobilization Universe — The Quarterback — Seamless Transition — Sleight of Hand — Five Pillars — The Sam Adams Alliance — Propaganda “Dressed Up as Journalism” — Capturing the States — Structure of Social Change — A Blueprint Years in the Making — Winning.

 

Or try one of these novels:

+-+905961374_70 Underground Airlines by Ben H. Winters

Tells the story of a bounty hunter in an alternative present where the U.S. Civil War never happened and slavery still exists in the “hard four” states.

+-+527264474_70 The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear by Stuart Stevens

PS3569.T4532 I56 2016

A satire about a campaign manager for a sitting vice president at a Republican convention with a right-wing, populist candidate.

 

Books from Today’s New York Times

Today’s NYTimes contains a book review for Trainwreck: the Women We Love to Hate, Mock and Fear. This book is not yet available, but is on order at our CTW partner Wesleyan University, and once in you may have it sent to you here at Trinity.

Other books mentioned in the article are available at Trinity now:

 

 

 

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