Category: Announcements (Page 2 of 4)

Expiring Streaming Films

Trinity Swank videos

Recently added videos to the Trinity Swank collection

Many classes use library streaming video resources, and we expect this fall will be no different. Films from Kanopy and Swank are on one-year licenses with expiration dates throughout the year. If you’ve used a film in the past, or even checked it recently, it might expire before the class starts.  Records in OneSearch list expiration dates and you may look there or ask us to check for you.

The films below have recently expired or will expire soon. The number of times the film was viewed last year is also indicated. Please check and let us know if there is a film you need to use in the fall so that we can renew the license.

Title Views Provider
A Better Life (2011) 16 Swank
A Bridge Too Far (1977) 32 Swank
Chinatown (1974) 8 Swank
Coming of Age in Aging America – Exploring the Social Impacts of an Aging Population 0 Kanopy
Complaints of a Dutiful Daughter – The Academy Award nominated Doc on Alzheimers 2 Kanopy
Holy Motors (2012) 17 Swank
La Haine (1995) 19 Swank
Monster in the Mind – Investigating the Untruths of Alzheimer’s (playlist) 2 Kanopy
Post Truth Times: We The Media – Navigating Information in a Post-Truth Media Landscape 1 Kanopy
Rocky IV (1985) 26 Swank
Still Doing It 5 Kanopy
The Big Sleep (1946) 12 Swank
The Little Mermaid (1989) 12 Swank
The Manchurian Candidate (1962) 143 Swank

Why Don’t We Live Forever?

0 Kanopy

The films below expired earlier this summer.

Video Title  Provider
Bed and Board  Kanopy
Scottsboro  Kanopy
Scanners  Kanopy
Kedi  Kanopy
People Like Us  Kanopy
A Man Escaped  Kanopy
Killing Us Softly  Kanopy
Donovan’s Reef  Swank
Eye in the Sky  Swank
Margin Call  Swank
Rio Bravo  Swank
The Big Red One  Swank
The Truman Show  Swank

Information Services Statement Supporting Anti-Racism

The unjust deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks, and so many other people of color through police brutality and other symptoms of systemic racism, have devastated our communities. In response, Information Services at Trinity College affirms that Black Lives Matter. It is our responsibility as citizens to eliminate all forms of systemic racism that pervade our society and, as a result, our campus. This work will be neither quick nor easy. Indeed, precisely because of this difficulty we must take it up, recognizing that the work of education cannot be complete until all are free.

As a first step, we express our support for and agreement with President Joanne Berger-Sweeney’s call to action, as well as the Oberlin Group Statement Against Racism, the ALA’s Libraries Respond: Black Lives Matter Plan for Action, and Educause’s Statement on Racial Justice and Recent Events. Although libraries and IT organizations ought to be, and often have been, engines for social change, we have also too often reinforced and even exacerbated the injustice in society writ large. Moving forward, we must work constantly to facilitate social justice. We take that mission seriously.

We look forward to joining in this work with students, faculty, staff, and the broader Trinity community, and encourage members of that broader community to reach out with any ideas on how we can become a more inclusive, equitable institution. We’ve begun with our Antiracism Reading List, and we pledge to support further research into Trinity’s own history and archives. We look forward to working with the Umoja Coalition, whose demands we support. In particular, we commit to diversifying Information Services staff and partnering with Black student organizations to combat systemic racism in our organization.

Remote Learning and Research Support

The library would like the Trinity community to know that we are prepared to support remote learning and research for as long as needed.

Any fines that may occur for materials due while students remain off campus will be waived.  Options are being explored to extend the due dates of materials due before April 5th.

All of the library’s electronic resources are accessible off campus.  You do NOT need to sign into the VPN.  To access these databases you must do so through a link from any of the following sources:

You will be asked to sign in with your Trinity username and password before accessing the first resource each session.

If you encounter any problems please contact the library at library.feedback@trincoll.edu
or call 860-297-2007

Public Printing Improvements

Picture of Canon multi-function printerDue to the new printing system and the new Canon multi-function devices, we’ve been able to make a few improvements over winter break. We have added 11×17 and legal sized page options, dramatically reduced the cost of color printing, and fixed some of the issues you might have experienced with the new system. We recommend you try the new Canon multi-function printer/copier/scanner in Library’s A level 24-hour zone. We are adding another Canon multi-function machine on the B level very soon as well. These devices cost less and offer more options than the old print release stations. If you would like advice on how to use the new devices to print limited page ranges, add staples, or anything else, please feel free to ask us at the Information Services Desk on Level A or visit our website!

 

Blind Date with a Book

Book wrapped in brown paper, red heart decoration

Have a blind date with a book.

Winter blues got you down? Why not try a one night stand with a book? Staff and students working in Information Services have recommended some of their favorite reads for you! The catch is you have to take a bit of a leap of faith and try something new–our books are wrapped up so you won’t know the title and this will be a blind date. But as always at the library, the book is free to you, so you have literally nothing to lose.  And unlike a person blind date, you won’t need to plan an exit strategy.

The books are available now in the library atrium. Join us Friday February 7, 2020, 1 to 3pm in the atrium of LITC for cupcakes and candy to celebrate having a Blind Date with a Book!

Laptop/Cell Phone Charging Station on Level A

In addition to the cell phone charging station located near the scanners on Level A, we now have a charging station for Mac laptops and IPhone and Android cell phones. (Unfortunately, Windows computer chargers are very specific to the individual manufacturer and may damage devices, so we are unable to provide those.) Just look for the signs on Level A like the one below or ask for help at the Information Services Desk.

“Commencement Book” now available for view in Digital Repository

It is sometimes called Bishop Brownell’s Book, or the Commencement Book. Peter Knapp in his Trinity College in the Twentieth Century simply calls it, “The Book.”

Not to be confused with the Matriculation Book, “‘The Book’ is a small, early-19th century record book that all recipients of Trinity degrees touch during Commencement ceremonies,” Knapp states.  The Book remains unnamed due in part to its contents: its pages contain details of the Commencement exercises and degrees, prayers for graduates in Latin, and include signatures from more recent Trinity College presidential inaugurations. It is a curious and important piece of Trinity history, originating from a legendary mix-up during the first Commencement ceremony in 1827. College President Thomas Church Brownell intended for students to place their hands on a Bible during commencement exercises, but either couldn’t find one or realized he didn’t bring it with him to the ceremony, and so he used his personal record book instead.

“By chance, the Book became one of the college’s oldest traditions,” Peter Knapp writes. “The Book’s use at Commencement appears to have been inconsistent in the years following the Bishop’s Presidency, but it can be said with certainty that all Trinity graduates have touched it” since the 1946-47 academic year.

Thanks to the efforts of College Archivist Eric Stoykovich, the Book was recently retrieved for digitization and is now available to view in the Digital Repository. The physical book resides in a safe location on campus in order to ensure its preservation for annual use at Commencement.

Source: Trinity College in the Twentieth Century by Peter Knapp, pages 232-33.

Changes to Kanopy Film Streaming Library

In July the Trinity Library switched from an instant access model to a mediated access model for the Kanopy Film Streaming Library.  While the immediate access to films in Kanopy was very appealing, rapid increases in use and associated costs made the service financially unsustainable for the library. Trinity is not alone in this: other institutions who are going to a mediated or very restricted access include Stanford, the University of Michigan and many others.

Kanopy’s pay-when-viewed model charges the library an annual licensing fee when a certain percentage of the film has been viewed or the film has been viewed three times.  The mediated access model gives viewers the option to request access to films that that library has not purchased a streaming license for in the last twelve months.  These requests are sent to the librarians for evaluation, who will look for the most cost-effective way to provide the film.  In most cases when a request is made during normal business hours it will be processed within 24 hours.

Because of costs the library will only authorize use of Kanopy films for academic use.  For any other film requests we will do our best to direct the interested user to an alternate viewing method.  We encourage you to browse the media collections of the Trinity, Wesleyan, and Connecticut College libraries.

What does this mean for you?

  • Faculty must contact the library ahead of time if they wish to screen a film in class or assign a film for class viewing. We’ll try activate titles quickly, but we’ll need a minimum one business day lead time.
  • For any film content, please just tell us the title and version, director, etc. of the film. We’ll figure out the best platform to deliver the content in a way that minimizes costs.
  • Once a film is licensed through Kanopy it will be discoverable in OneSearch. Search for the title and follow the links in the record to view the streaming content.

If you have any questions about these changes please contact Kim Rinaldo (kimberly.rinaldo@trincoll.edu) or Katie Bauer (kathleen.bauer@trincoll.edu)

 

 

Trinity and Open Education Resources

Open Education ResourcesCollege students today face high costs in more than just tuition–increases in textbook prices have far exceeded the rate of inflation. This puts an unnecessary burden on students, and Trinity is looking for ways to ease that burden. You can learn more about the issue in this Tripod article, contributed by Matthew Boyle ’19. The Dean of Faculty and Information Services are sponsoring a pilot project for faculty to investigate available open resource textbooks which would be free or very low cost for students to use. With funding from the Dean’s Office, seven faculty have applied for and been given OER grants:

 

Harry Blaise, Engineering

Clayton Byers, Engineering

Stefanie Chambers, Political Science

Carol Clark, Economics

Jack Dougherty, Educational Studies

Troy Helming, Economics

Todd Ryan, Philosophy

 

We thank the Dean and these faculty for their support of this program, and we hope it will only be the start of more programs like it at Trinity in the future.

 

Resist Newsletters join Digital Repository

Nearly 50 years of Resist, Inc. bi-monthly newsletters are now available in the Trinity College Digital Repository as text-searchable PDFs, soon to be joined by documents from Resist steering committee meetings. Part of a large archive recently donated by Resist, Inc. to Trinity College’s Watkinson Library, the newsletters provide a window into activities of the organization and into broader national and international resistance efforts as well.

Founded in Boston to support and promote resistance to the Vietnam War and draft, Resist authored “The Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority,” published 9/28/1967 in the New York Review of Books. Primary signers of this first “Call” included intellectuals and scholars such as Noam Chomsky, Dr. Benjamin Spock, William Sloane Coffin Jr., Dwight Macdonald, Allen Ginsberg, and Rev. Robert MacAfee Brown, and Trinity College’s Paul Lauter. The “Call” asked for universities, religious institutions, groups and individuals to “raise funds to organize draft resistance unions, to supply legal defense and bail, to support families and otherwise to aid resistance to the war in whatever ways seem appropriate” (“Call to Resist,” 1967). Monies received by Resist from monthly contributions and other sources were primarily channeled into grants for petitioning organizations, and much of the monthly steering committee meetings was dedicated to accepting or denying these numerous grant applications.

See the Paul Lauter ‘Sixties Archive in the Watkinson Library for related materials, and see also Trinity Tripod issues dated 1968-1970.

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