Tuesday, August 20, 2019

The Trinitones team with the Pipes for a spectacular evening

ISABEL MONTELEONE ’16

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

On a cold New England fall night, two of our very own a cappella groups, The Trinitones and The Pipes, came together to offer the Trinity crowd a performance full of surprises and musical talent that was sure to warm you up. As soon as Hamlin Hall was filled with excited and anxious music-loving Trinity students, the Pipes came cheering down the aisle. Strangely enough, they were all dressed up in the average classy Trinitone attire: black dresses and collared shirts, heels, dress shoes, and of course, pearl necklaces. But they didn’t just imitate the Trinitones in attire, but in attitude and song as well. They started out doo-whopping away to the Trinitones go-to hit “Peppermint Twist.” The night was sure to continue down a comical, entertaining, and pleasurable path.

After many laughs and giggles from the crowd, the Pipes got serious and began with their first song of the night, “Softly” by Frank Sinatra. As they transitioned from note to note, the piece flowed with utter magnificence as the male and female voices blended in perfection, giving the piece a light and airy feel. Their second piece, “Babylon” by David Gray, was equally stunning. Mike Newkirk ’14 had a warm voice in his solo for “Babylon” that exemplified the many characteristics of a Pipe: low-key, welcoming, comforting, and warm. Their many “ginninnas” and “doo-doos” added to the quality of their voices, but the piece really came alive when each member burst into the refrain of the song. Their third piece of the night was a rendition of “Fix You” by Coldplay. Both Brie McBride ’16 and Jake Miller ’14 were the soloists. The piece was so indescribably beautiful that it would have brought even Chris Martin himself to his knees. There was a harmonious yet mellow tone to the piece that really wowed the crowd. The bridge when the male and female voices came together was really the stunner. Newkirk began to beat box at the pinnacle of the song, dramatically bringing the piece to a whole new level of beautiful. The Pipes’ last song was “Meaning” by Gavin DeGraw. Andrew McGarrah ’14 was the soloist for this last piece. The piece had such movement to it that made people want to burst out of their seats. The beat boxing that was incorporated into the song brought the piece to a whole new level of meaning, and with that it was time for the Trinitones to take the stage.

As the Pipes left the stage, the Tones walked in, likewise imitating the look and feel of the Pipes. They were dressed in button down shirts, some paired with baseball caps and boots, bringing together the cool and country vibe of the Pipes. Similarly to the Pipes emulating their song choice, the Tones began to sing “Cecilia” by Simon and Garfunkel. Upon purposefully messing it up to prove that it wasn’t their song, director Tina Lipson ’14 stopped the girls through the many laughs from the crowd and said, “let’s stick to what we know.” The Trinitones first song was “For the Longest Time” by Elton John. Upon opening their mouths, the song fell perfectly in tune, as one by one, Lipson, Kathryn Durkin ’15, Madeleine Dickinson ’14, Fiona Brennan ’15, Marie Christner ’15, and Ayala Cohen ’13 each sang solos. They incorporated the signature Trinitone snaps into this piece as well. Their second song was a version of “Can’t Hurry Love” by The Supremes. Dickinson was the soloist, giving the song a quality of exquisiteness. “Fever” by Ella Fitzgerald was the next song they performed for the crowd, soloed by Christner. This swanky tune fit Christner’s pure and soulful 50’s voice. The Trinitones certainly gave the crowd fever with their sizzling voices on this song as well. For their last piece, The Trinitones sang an empowering and inspiring rendition of Jason Mraz’s “I Won’t Give Up.” Concluding with this song left the audience feeling uplifted and motivated.

Tone Your Pipes provided Trinity students with a spectacular evening of fun and talent on a chilly Friday night.

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