Author: krinaldo

New Library Exhibit: Freedom of Speech, the Right of Expression

The library is pleased to announce the opening of our new exhibit, “Freedom of Speech, the Right of Expression”.  This exhibit showcases some of the resources held by both Trinity and Watkinson libraries focusing on the issues of freedom of speech and expression.  You can view this exhibit in the left display case in the library atrium and online at http://tclibrary.omeka.net/exhibits/show/freedom-of-speech

The resources in this exhibit include a multitude of books and essays discussing and analyzing freedom of speech and expression.  While some of these are general treatments of the topic others delve into more specific aspects, such as how freedom of speech is perceived on college campuses, arguments both for and against censorship, freedom of speech as it relates to wartime, specific discussion of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, analysis of how freedom of speech is used for oppression, and more.

Also included are sources from the special collections like John Milton’s influential work Areopagitica, which has been used as the basis for defining freedom of speech in several Supreme Court cases, Martin Luther King Jr.’s letter from Birmingham City Jail, in which he responds to criticisms of those who feel the protests he engaged in were uncalled for and the unjustness of the laws that led to his arrest for taking part in non-violent direct action, and examples from archived volumes of The Trinity Tripod, of Trinity students expressing their rights of freedom of speech and protest by participating in major anti-war rallies in protest of the Vietnam War.

Freedom of speech and expression is valued by people and nations worldwide.  Yet despite widespread acceptance of its importance one would be hard pressed to find a location or time period where it was not a contentious subject.  What actions fall under freedom of expression rights?  What topics or concept are and are not protected?  What constitutes suppression of these right?  Though the answer to these questions is not clear, that should not stop individuals from educating themselves in order to come to their own conclusions.  We invite you to begin this process by examining the resources featured in this exhibit, as well as the many others held by the Trinity and Watkinson libraries!

Streaming Films from Swank Motion Pictures

As part of a pilot program started last September Trinity College made arrangements to purchase streaming licenses for thirty films from Swank Motion Pictures.  Now twenty seven of these films are available to view!  Selected by professors for use in their courses, these films run the gambit from comedies to documentaries.  You do not need to be taking the professor’s class to view these films!  Just visit Trinity’s Swank Portal and select the film you want to watch.  But be aware these streaming licenses only last for a limited time, so if you see something interesting be sure to watch it before it’s gone.

These films are not licensed for public performance.  Closed captions are available.

Children’s/Family

Walt Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (1991)

Comedy

The Lobster

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream Home

State and Main

Tangerine

The Trouble with Harry

Crime

Bound

City of God

Documentary

Amandala! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony

Control Room

The Flat

How to Survive a Plague

Drama

The Affair of the Necklace

Beloved

Clouds of Sila Maria

Dangerous Liaisons

Do the Right Thing

Marie Antoinette

Milk

Pariah

Horror

Get Out

Science Fiction

Back to the Future

District 9

Dune (1984)

Inception

Thriller

The Man Who Knew Too Much

War

Saving Private Ryan

 

Expanding the Leisure Reading Collection

What do you like to read in your spare time?  The library wants to know!

While staff is doing some selection of additional volumes to add to the leisure reading collection, our goal is to create a collection filled with books recommended by the collection’s primary audience, the students themselves!  Recently, at a student’s request, the library purchased twenty-three additional books for the collection, including Viet Thanh Nguyen’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Sympathizer, Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn, Wax and Wayne, and Stormlight Archives series, Sue Monk Kid’s The Secret Life of Bees, Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves, and several books from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series.  These books can be found in the library’s new book shelves on Level A.

If you have suggestions for books, authors, or genres you would like to see added to the collection, let us know!  You can email Kim Rinaldo, kimberly.rinaldo@trincoll.edu, with your suggestions.

Since we estimate significant growth in the leisure reading and graphic novel collections, both collections will be moving from the periodicals reading room on Level 1 to the shelves on Level A across from the new books area.  You can expect to see the collections in their new location in early 2018.

New Arrival: Making Faces The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face

New at the library is Adam Wilkins’ book, Making Faces: The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face.  This book can be found on the first floor of the library (Level A) in the new books section.  Why not take a look at it and the library’s other new books today?

The face is one of humanity’s most complex and versatile means of Book Cover-Making Facescommunication.  In this book Adam Wilkins, author of The Evolution of Developmental Pathways and editor of the “Perspectives” section of Genetics, investigates the development of the human face and brain to track not only the evolution of the musculoskeletal structure that makes our uniquely wide array of facial expressions possible, but also of a brain capable of reading and interpreting these expressions.

Drawing from research in molecular biology, genetics, developmental biology, paleontology, anthropology, and comparative studies of non-human species Wilkins builds a foundation for the argument that the development of facial expressions is both the product and the enabler of human society.

Making Faces is a highly readable account of how and why the human face is the way it is.  Wilkins lucidly weaves together over a century of research on the development, anatomy, and evolution with new provocative ideas.”

– Daniel E. Lieberman, author of The Evolution of the Human Hand

Independent Voices

The influx of dissenting ideals forming in the American populace in the 60’s is best exemplified by the emergence of a wave of alternative press.  Published by feminist groups, anti-war activists, Black Power advocates, campus radicals, and members of the LGBT communities, among many others, these newspapers, magazines, and journals focused on spreading the tenants of these radical new ideas.  From 2013 to 2017 Reveal Digital made it a goal to digitize a large number of these alternative press publications and make them available in an open access format as a part of their Independent Voices collection.  To complete this goal Reveal Digital partnered with libraries that held copies of these publications as a part of their collection and with 107 other academic libraries that provided financial support.  The Trinity Library is proud to be a supporter of Independent Voices and we are even more excited to report that the digitization of publications has been completed and the collection is now available online!

Independent Voices is the largest digital collection of alternative press publications; containing over 1000 publications divided by subject into seven series.  Included in this are the five original Underground Press Syndicate titles, East Village Other, Los Angeles Free Press, Berkeley Barb, The Paper, and Fifth Estate.  Follow the links below to view a list of publications included in each series.

Feminist Series

LGBT Series

Literary Magazines Series

GI Underground Press Series

Campus Underground

Minority Presses, Latino(a) Series

Minority Presses, Native American Series

Minority Presses, Black American Titles

Right-wing Presses Series

Don’t wait to take advantage of this fantastic historical resource!  You can search or browse the collection today by visiting the Independent Voices Archive.