Category: Library Collection (page 1 of 2)

Finding Film Content in OneSearch

Overview of video content offered by Trinity Library

Trinity Library offers a vast selection of films for teaching and learning. In addition to a rich DVD collection, the Library subscribes to several subscription packages of film content. These include:

  • Kanopy – Over 2,000 educational and feature films from major producers including California Newsreel, Criterion Collection, Green Planet Films, Kino Lorber, and others.
  • Films on Demand – Over 30,000 educational and documentary videos from Films Media Group and content producers such as news broadcasting networks , HBO, NOVA, BBC, National Geographic and more.
  • Swank –  A small but growing collection of feature films.

Any title  from the above subscription packages can be conveniently provided to students in a course by embedding a direct link into a course Moodle page. Please see this post for tips. Additionally, the Library can provide streaming video access to DVDs via Moodle by faculty request.  Visit this page for more information on Kaltura streaming video services.

Discovering content in OneSearch.

The most effective way to search in OneSearch is to begin with a title or keyword and then apply filters on the results screen.

The screen shot below shows the results of a keyword search for “marriage.” To find video content, select Trinity College under Institution, and use the additional filters on the left side in the following ways:

 To Find Apply the Filters
Films in Kanopy, Films on Demand, or Swank Under Resource Type, click “Show more” and select Audio and Video (Streaming). Note this will also include audio.
 DVDs Under Resource Type, click “Show more” and select Video (DVD/VHS).
DVDs that have previously been uploaded to Kaltura for course viewing Under Resource Type, click “Show more” and select Video (DVD/VHS), and, under Availability select Full Text Online.

 

OneSearch screen shot

For additional assistance finding film content or using it in classes, please contact your instructional technologist or a research librarian.

New Library Exhibit: Freedom of Speech, the Right of Expression

The library is pleased to announce the opening of our new exhibit, “Freedom of Speech, the Right of Expression”.  This exhibit showcases some of the resources held by both Trinity and Watkinson libraries focusing on the issues of freedom of speech and expression.  You can view this exhibit in the left display case in the library atrium and online at http://tclibrary.omeka.net/exhibits/show/freedom-of-speech

The resources in this exhibit include a multitude of books and essays discussing and analyzing freedom of speech and expression.  While some of these are general treatments of the topic others delve into more specific aspects, such as how freedom of speech is perceived on college campuses, arguments both for and against censorship, freedom of speech as it relates to wartime, specific discussion of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, analysis of how freedom of speech is used for oppression, and more.

Also included are sources from the special collections like John Milton’s influential work Areopagitica, which has been used as the basis for defining freedom of speech in several Supreme Court cases, Martin Luther King Jr.’s letter from Birmingham City Jail, in which he responds to criticisms of those who feel the protests he engaged in were uncalled for and the unjustness of the laws that led to his arrest for taking part in non-violent direct action, and examples from archived volumes of The Trinity Tripod, of Trinity students expressing their rights of freedom of speech and protest by participating in major anti-war rallies in protest of the Vietnam War.

Freedom of speech and expression is valued by people and nations worldwide.  Yet despite widespread acceptance of its importance one would be hard pressed to find a location or time period where it was not a contentious subject.  What actions fall under freedom of expression rights?  What topics or concept are and are not protected?  What constitutes suppression of these right?  Though the answer to these questions is not clear, that should not stop individuals from educating themselves in order to come to their own conclusions.  We invite you to begin this process by examining the resources featured in this exhibit, as well as the many others held by the Trinity and Watkinson libraries!

Digital Collections & Services Projects Update

The student staff working for Digital Collections & Services has been busy this semester completing two projects: the George Watson Cole Postcard collection, and the Trinity College Bulletins, housed in Watkinson. Students have digitized hundreds of postcards this semester, with just a few hundred remaining which will complete Trinity’s digital collection of Cole’s 10,000 postcards. The postcards already digitized and cataloged are available for view in Shared Shelf Commons and Artstor. George Watson Cole was a librarian and bibliographer, friend and contemporary of famous librarians Melvil Dewey and Charles Cutter, who traveled through France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, and England in the early 1900s and collected every postcard he could find. As a result, Trinity houses one half of his 20,000 postcards, primarily depicting pre-WWI Europe and some of California. These postcards show a slice of life: people, towns, maps, and churches as they appeared at the turn of the century and before two world wars devastated Europe.

The Trinity College Bulletins are also nearly complete, with a few volumes left from the 1940s and 50s, on which the students are currently working. During Fall 2017, the students completed digitization of Bulletins from the early 1990s to 2010.

The Bulletins include annual reports of the College President, Treasurer, and Librarian, the yearly library catalog and curriculum, necrology lists, faculty publications, photographs, summer school and graduate school information, among other booklets. The digitized bulletins stem from 1829 and are available to view on the Digital Repository. To get to the digital repository, visit the college library catalog –> Digital Collections –> Digital Repository –> College history, archives, and publications.

A biography of James Williams (1790 – 1878), who served as janitor to Trinity College for over 50 years, is also now available in the Digital Repository.

Photographs from the Collection of the Gilman Paper Company

Italian Family Seeking Lost Luggage, Ellis Island, 1905, Lewis W. Hine

Sometimes described as the “Gutenberg Bible” of photographic printing, Photographs from the Collection of the Gilman Paper Company #1173 reproduces 200 photos from the highly regarded collection of the same name acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2005.  Illustrating the history of photography, the photogravure images were hand-printed by Richard Benson, Dean of the Yale School of Art, and range from 1800s daguerreotypes to 20th Century photos by Robert Frank and Diane Arbus.  Trinity College’s Raether Library is fortunate to have been chosen to receive this volume from Nathaniel Gibbons, photographic artist and friend of Richard Benson, and supporter of Yale University Art Gallery’s program to share remaining copies with select educational and cultural institutions.

It is the hope of Mr. Gibbons that our volume will be appreciated for its collection of photos, but also as an example of fine printing and bookbinding, and that it will prove to be a valuable resource for Trinity College students.  The book will be housed within our Watkinson Library, and will be accessible to Trinity faculty and students as well as interested outside users.

Connecticut Connections: Historical College Scrapbooks from Connecticut College, Trinity College, and Wesleyan University

Over the past year, the CTW Digital Projects Group, which encompasses staff from Connecticut College, Trinity College, and Wesleyan University, came together to consider how the three schools might collaborate on digitizing and publishing archival or other materials owned by each school.

For its pilot project, the group selected student-made scrapbooks from multiple eras: those of Linda Abel, a student at Connecticut College from 1965-1969, Lynn Smith Miller, a student at Wesleyan from 1910-1914, and Phillip DeWitt Phair, who attended Trinity College from 1890 – 1894. The scrapbooks offer a glimpse into college student life during these periods through ephemera such as playbills and athletic event tickets, dance and social cards, artwork, valentines, invitations and letters, newspaper clippings, menus, and miscellaneous objects.

Utilizing the University of Southern California’s open-source platform, Scalar, members of the group scanned and uploaded an image of each scrapbook page, jointly decided on metadata fields, and added metadata and descriptions for each page, as well as a biography and introduction to each scrapbook.

“Connecticut Connections” was recently presented at the CTW Retreat in downtown Hartford and is publicly available online at: http://scalar.usc.edu/works/ctwscrapbooks. 

Expanding the Leisure Reading Collection

What do you like to read in your spare time?  The library wants to know!

While staff is doing some selection of additional volumes to add to the leisure reading collection, our goal is to create a collection filled with books recommended by the collection’s primary audience, the students themselves!  Recently, at a student’s request, the library purchased twenty-three additional books for the collection, including Viet Thanh Nguyen’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Sympathizer, Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn, Wax and Wayne, and Stormlight Archives series, Sue Monk Kid’s The Secret Life of Bees, Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves, and several books from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series.  These books can be found in the library’s new book shelves on Level A.

If you have suggestions for books, authors, or genres you would like to see added to the collection, let us know!  You can email Kim Rinaldo, kimberly.rinaldo@trincoll.edu, with your suggestions.

Since we estimate significant growth in the leisure reading and graphic novel collections, both collections will be moving from the periodicals reading room on Level 1 to the shelves on Level A across from the new books area.  You can expect to see the collections in their new location in early 2018.

Deer Jumping a Fence: March 12, 1908, Canaan, CT.

The Enders Ornithology Lantern Slides Collection comprises over 800 hand-tinted glass plate photographs, produced by Herbert Keightley Job from 1896 to 1925. Job was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1864 and was a minister, lecturer, author, ornithologist, and pioneer wildlife photographer.

Job’s slides are digitized and make up part of the Ostrom and Alice Talcott Enders Ornithology Collection, a comprehensive collection of over 5,000 items including books, original artwork, periodicals, and more in the Watkinson Library.

While many of Job’s slides are of birds, he photographed this deer in Canaan, CT jumping over a fence on March 12, 1908! Other slides include scenes of everyday life as well as architecture, landscapes, and animals, some of which were taken throughout Connecticut. What you find may surprise you!

Visit the Digital Collections page and select “Enders Ornithology Lantern Slides” under “Image Collections in Shared Shelf Commons” to view the collection. Learn about lantern slides here.

Library ‘wish list’ items

1885 map of Rockville, CTLate in the fiscal year, the Library reviews ‘wish list’ requests, and makes decisions based on available funds, relevance to student assignments, and faculty teaching & research.  A one-time purchase is preferred, even though it may require an annual service fee.

In Spring 2017, purchases included Caribbean Studies in Video: the Banyan Archive and the Digital National Security Archive.

Current ‘wish list’ items include China Academic Journals (East View; subscription), Communication & Mass Media Complete (EBSCO; subscription) and the Digital Sanborn Maps (ProQuest; subscription or one-time purchase).  All are currently available as a 30-day trial subscription via the A-Z Database list.

For questions or comments about e-resources or journal subscriptions, please contact Jennifer van Sickle at Jennifer.vansickle@trincoll.edu

1885 map of Rockville, CT, from the Sanborn map collection

Streaming Movie Options Swank

Citizen Kane poster

Be sure to check out movie titles available for classroom use from Swank. The Library licensed Swank content because we often have requests for feature films or TV shows not covered in our other resources Kanopy and Films on Demand. This week Swank is highlighting material from HBO like

We only pay for Swank movies that we request and turn on in their interface. If you see a title in Swank that you want to use for a course just send email to Kim Rinaldo at kimberly.rinaldo@trincoll.edu know and we’ll have Swank turn that on for Trinity access.

Trinity Library Exploring Alternatives for Institutional Repository

Beprexit logo, project of the UPenn Libraries

Beprexit

The Trinity Digital Repository is an open access resource for papers written by Trinity faculty and students, materials from the Trinity libraries, and Trinity publications. It is open to anyone, anywhere in the world. Making material freely available fits perfectly with the mission of the library, and supporting it has been important to staff. Open access material also helps raise the visibility of Trinity publications, as you can see in the list of popular downloads. We have always hosted the repository with a company called Bepress, which was a small independent start up when Trinity started working with them. This year Bepress was purchased by the publishing giant Elsevier, causing great angst among the library community active in institutional repositories and open access initiatives. This was recently expressed by the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, who announced their Beprexit project to find an alternative to Bepress. Like University of Pennsylvania and many other institutions, Trinity is looking at alternatives to Bepress now that it is owned by Elsevier.

I’m not completely an Elsevier critic. They provide high-quality access to a large body of scholarly work, and we license a lot of highly-used digital content from them. Elsevier is also very expensive, and they have a deserved reputation for purchasing many smaller publishers and affiliated service companies, giving rise to concerns about a monopoly, or something close to a monopoly. There are a few other big publishers, such as Kluwer, but there are far less publishers than when I started in the library profession.

To be fair to Elsevier they also have a history of supporting some open access initiatives, for example, the Hinari project. Through Hinari,  a program run by the WHO, Elsevier makes medical journals available to low and middle-income countries. They also have made no move they libraries have seen to shut down or put new conditions on Bepress repositories. Still, the move by Elsevier to take over Bepress is unsettling to say the least.  It isn’t entire clear why Elsevier purchased Bepress, but they have been very active in purchasing other platforms and citation tools like Mendeley aimed at the academic community. There is some thought that Elsevier is seeking to link open access preprints to the publication process. We in the library believe that we need to carefully examine options other than Bepress to host our repository.

The environment for repositories has changed pretty dramatically since we started with Bepress. There are more options available to us, many of which have been developed within the open access/open source community. Over the next few months the library will talk with companies that support DSpace, Islandora,  and Preservica. We’ll also talk with Bepress, since we are not necessarily ready to abandon a platform that has worked well for us. We do need to be concerned with both access and long-term management of our materials. We need a solution that will minimize our costs, and assure us that we can continue to provide access to Trinity materials in a reliable, open, and anonymous way (without intrusive data mining from any external company).

We invite any students or faculty to contact us with comments or concerns as we explore repository options.

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