Campus-wide Newspaper Subscriptions

The library has set up campus-wide subscriptions to ​The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post, which are available to all current faculty, staff, and students.

  • The New York Times: After registration, users may log in from anywhere or use the app.  Users who already have an account with a Trinity e-mail don’t need to register again.  Faculty & staff must re-register every year.  Please check the Library A-Z entry for more details. Sign up online​.
  • The Wall Street Journal: Individuals must create a personal account while on the network. Once an account is set up, access is via login/password from anywhere, including the mobile WSJ app. Content from the last four years is available on a rolling basis. Sign up online​.
  • Washington Post: No registration required.

Trinidad Carnival Images from Trinity’s Trinidad Global Learning Program!

Photo by Jeffrey Chock for Trinity in Trinidad Global Learning Site

Nearly 400 photographic slides of Trinidad Carnival dating from about 1998 were produced in association with the Trinity College in Trinidad Global Learning Site.  These have been digitized and published online by our Digital Collections and Services staff and are publicly available to view as the Trinidad Carnival Images collection in our licensed Artstor image repository.  The images document Carnival activities, participants, and many traditional characters and costumes.   https://library.artstor.org/#/collection/10003682. Continue reading

Take a break, read a good book!

There isn’t much better on a chilly autumn day than curling up under a blanket with a good book.  If you’re looking for the right book to do just that, the library has you covered!  Along with the myriad of classic works that can be found in the main collection the library has a dedicated collection of over 1300 popular fiction novels, young adult novels, popular nonfiction books, and graphic novels in the Leisure Reading and Graphic Novels collections.

Can’t find the book you want?  Let us know and we will do our best to add it to the collection!  You can leave requests for new purchases on the suggestion whiteboard located next to the Leisure Reading collection or send requests directly to Kim Rinaldo (leisure reading) or Rob Walsh (graphic novels).

Here are just a few of the new books added to these collections this year:

  • The Cabin at the End of the World, Paul Tremblay (2018 Bram Stoker Award Winner)
  • The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal (2019 Hugo Award Winner)
  • Celestial Bodies, Jokha Alharthi (2019 Man Booker Prize Winner)
  • Good Omens, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (Student Request)
  • Neuromancer, William Gibson (Student Request)
  • The Overstory, Richard Powers (2019 Pulitzer Prize Winner)
  • Sailor Moon Vol. 1-3, Naoko Takeuchi (Student Request)
  • So B. It, Sarah Weeks (Student Request)
  • Skyward, Brandon Sanderson (Student Request)
  • Spiderman Noir, David Hine (Student Request)
  • Umbrella Academy Vol. 1, Gerard Way (Student Request)

New this year to the library is the Wellness Collection.  Books in this collection address wellness topics relevant to young adults in general and college students in particular, such as healthy eating, self-love, fitness, social skills, and managing stress.  Feel free to request new purchases for the wellness collection too, either by writing your request on the suggestion whiteboard or sending it to Kim Rinaldo.

These collections can be found on Level A near the Watkinson Library entrance.  Books from these collections are also often featured on the displays near the library’s front desk.  October’s display theme is horror, so if you’re a fan of scary stories be sure to check it out!  You can also see a sample of the books in these three collections at the Mather Hall pop up libraries.  These pop up libraries run from noon to 1:30 on October 23, November, 6, November 20, and December 11 and can be found at a table in the front entrance of Mather Hall.

Changes to Kanopy Film Streaming Library

In July the Trinity Library switched from an instant access model to a mediated access model for the Kanopy Film Streaming Library.  While the immediate access to films in Kanopy was very appealing, rapid increases in use and associated costs made the service financially unsustainable for the library. Trinity is not alone in this: other institutions who are going to a mediated or very restricted access include Stanford, the University of Michigan and many others.

Kanopy’s pay-when-viewed model charges the library an annual licensing fee when a certain percentage of the film has been viewed or the film has been viewed three times.  The mediated access model gives viewers the option to request access to films that that library has not purchased a streaming license for in the last twelve months.  These requests are sent to the librarians for evaluation, who will look for the most cost-effective way to provide the film.  In most cases when a request is made during normal business hours it will be processed within 24 hours.

Because of costs the library will only authorize use of Kanopy films for academic use.  For any other film requests we will do our best to direct the interested user to an alternate viewing method.  We encourage you to browse the media collections of the Trinity, Wesleyan, and Connecticut College libraries.

What does this mean for you?

  • Faculty must contact the library ahead of time if they wish to screen a film in class or assign a film for class viewing. We’ll try activate titles quickly, but we’ll need a minimum one business day lead time.
  • For any film content, please just tell us the title and version, director, etc. of the film. We’ll figure out the best platform to deliver the content in a way that minimizes costs.
  • Once a film is licensed through Kanopy it will be discoverable in OneSearch. Search for the title and follow the links in the record to view the streaming content.

If you have any questions about these changes please contact Kim Rinaldo (kimberly.rinaldo@trincoll.edu) or Katie Bauer (kathleen.bauer@trincoll.edu)

 

 

Trinity and Open Education Resources

Open Education ResourcesCollege students today face high costs in more than just tuition–increases in textbook prices have far exceeded the rate of inflation. This puts an unnecessary burden on students, and Trinity is looking for ways to ease that burden. You can learn more about the issue in this Tripod article, contributed by Matthew Boyle ’19. The Dean of Faculty and Information Services are sponsoring a pilot project for faculty to investigate available open resource textbooks which would be free or very low cost for students to use. With funding from the Dean’s Office, seven faculty have applied for and been given OER grants:

 

Harry Blaise, Engineering

Clayton Byers, Engineering

Stefanie Chambers, Political Science

Carol Clark, Economics

Jack Dougherty, Educational Studies

Troy Helming, Economics

Todd Ryan, Philosophy

 

We thank the Dean and these faculty for their support of this program, and we hope it will only be the start of more programs like it at Trinity in the future.

 

Resist Newsletters join Digital Repository

Nearly 50 years of Resist, Inc. bi-monthly newsletters are now available in the Trinity College Digital Repository as text-searchable PDFs, soon to be joined by documents from Resist steering committee meetings. Part of a large archive recently donated by Resist, Inc. to Trinity College’s Watkinson Library, the newsletters provide a window into activities of the organization and into broader national and international resistance efforts as well.

Founded in Boston to support and promote resistance to the Vietnam War and draft, Resist authored “The Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority,” published 9/28/1967 in the New York Review of Books. Primary signers of this first “Call” included intellectuals and scholars such as Noam Chomsky, Dr. Benjamin Spock, William Sloane Coffin Jr., Dwight Macdonald, Allen Ginsberg, and Rev. Robert MacAfee Brown, and Trinity College’s Paul Lauter. The “Call” asked for universities, religious institutions, groups and individuals to “raise funds to organize draft resistance unions, to supply legal defense and bail, to support families and otherwise to aid resistance to the war in whatever ways seem appropriate” (“Call to Resist,” 1967). Monies received by Resist from monthly contributions and other sources were primarily channeled into grants for petitioning organizations, and much of the monthly steering committee meetings was dedicated to accepting or denying these numerous grant applications.

See the Paul Lauter ‘Sixties Archive in the Watkinson Library for related materials, and see also Trinity Tripod issues dated 1968-1970.

Finding Film Content in OneSearch

Overview of video content offered by Trinity Library

Trinity Library offers a vast selection of films for teaching and learning. In addition to a rich DVD collection, the Library subscribes to several subscription packages of film content. These include:

  • Kanopy – Over 2,000 educational and feature films from major producers including California Newsreel, Criterion Collection, Green Planet Films, Kino Lorber, and others.
  • Films on Demand – Over 30,000 educational and documentary videos from Films Media Group and content producers such as news broadcasting networks , HBO, NOVA, BBC, National Geographic and more.
  • Swank –  A small but growing collection of feature films.

Any title  from the above subscription packages can be conveniently provided to students in a course by embedding a direct link into a course Moodle page. Please see this post for tips. Additionally, the Library can provide streaming video access to DVDs via Moodle by faculty request.  Visit this page for more information on Kaltura streaming video services.

Discovering content in OneSearch.

The most effective way to search in OneSearch is to begin with a title or keyword and then apply filters on the results screen.

The screen shot below shows the results of a keyword search for “marriage.” To find video content, select Trinity College under Institution, and use the additional filters on the left side in the following ways:

 To Find Apply the Filters
Films in Kanopy, Films on Demand, or Swank Under Resource Type, click “Show more” and select Audio and Video (Streaming). Note this will also include audio.
 DVDs Under Resource Type, click “Show more” and select Video (DVD/VHS).

 

For additional assistance finding film content or using it in classes, please contact your instructional technologist or a research librarian.

Trinity Welcomes Christina Bleyer, Director of Special Collections and Archives at Watkinson Library

Cristina Bleyer at the Watkinson. Photograph by Julie Bidwell.

Information Services is very excited to welcome Christina Bleyer, the new Director of Special Collections and Archives at the Watkinson Library. Christina brings to Trinity a wealth of knowledge and experience managing special collections.   Most recently she was the Head of Special Collections and Senior Archivist for the Benson Latin American Collection at the University of Texas, Austin.  Her notable achievements include securing grants to make collections discoverable through digitization, and the creation of a “virtual museum” to showcase archival material.  She is the principal investigator on a Latin American Materials grant “Digitizing the Los del Valle Oral History Collection,” and a Latin Americanist Research Resources Project “Illuminating the Genaro Garcia Collection through Digital Preservation Metadata Collection.”

In 2011 Christina was awarded a PhD in Philosophy by the University of Southern Illinois at Carbondale, where she then worked until 2016 managing their special collection. She  received undergraduate degrees in Philosophy from Loyola and Russian Language and Literature from Tulane. She is fluent in Portuguese, Spanish, and German, along with reading knowledge of Latin and French.

In a field that included several outstanding candidates, Christina impressed the search committee with both her passion for her work and her warm personality. We are thrilled to have her here and know that she will help write the next great chapter in the development of the Watkinson.

New Library Exhibit: Freedom of Speech, the Right of Expression

The library is pleased to announce the opening of our new exhibit, “Freedom of Speech, the Right of Expression”.  This exhibit showcases some of the resources held by both Trinity and Watkinson libraries focusing on the issues of freedom of speech and expression.  You can view this exhibit in the left display case in the library atrium and online at http://tclibrary.omeka.net/exhibits/show/freedom-of-speech

The resources in this exhibit include a multitude of books and essays discussing and analyzing freedom of speech and expression.  While some of these are general treatments of the topic others delve into more specific aspects, such as how freedom of speech is perceived on college campuses, arguments both for and against censorship, freedom of speech as it relates to wartime, specific discussion of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, analysis of how freedom of speech is used for oppression, and more.

Also included are sources from the special collections like John Milton’s influential work Areopagitica, which has been used as the basis for defining freedom of speech in several Supreme Court cases, Martin Luther King Jr.’s letter from Birmingham City Jail, in which he responds to criticisms of those who feel the protests he engaged in were uncalled for and the unjustness of the laws that led to his arrest for taking part in non-violent direct action, and examples from archived volumes of The Trinity Tripod, of Trinity students expressing their rights of freedom of speech and protest by participating in major anti-war rallies in protest of the Vietnam War.

Freedom of speech and expression is valued by people and nations worldwide.  Yet despite widespread acceptance of its importance one would be hard pressed to find a location or time period where it was not a contentious subject.  What actions fall under freedom of expression rights?  What topics or concept are and are not protected?  What constitutes suppression of these right?  Though the answer to these questions is not clear, that should not stop individuals from educating themselves in order to come to their own conclusions.  We invite you to begin this process by examining the resources featured in this exhibit, as well as the many others held by the Trinity and Watkinson libraries!

Get It Now is working again!

The Library is pleased to report that the Get It Now service is back online.  If you have any questions or problems, please contact Jennifer van Sickle or Kim Rinaldo.

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