A Warm Cozy Fireplace

When it’s cold outside, there’s nothing better than sitting by a cozy fire. 

You may already know how to reserve a study space in the library, but did you know that the library now features a cozy spot with a real burning fireplace? This nook is so much better than any 12-hour video of fireplace crackling sounds, and offers the true warmth someone needs to stay up all night and study.

You can’t book these comfortable seats in advance, but the fire will burn 24-hours a day for library patrons that are faced with late nights and early mornings. When you’re contemplating your next study space, look no further.

Find this warm and cozy fireplace on the 2nd and 3rd floors of the 24-hour zone of the library, in the DiBenedetto Reading Room. Enjoy!

Laptop/Cell Phone Charging Station on Level A

In addition to the cell phone charging station located near the scanners on Level A, we now have a charging station for Mac laptops and IPhone and Android cell phones. (Unfortunately, Windows computer chargers are very specific to the individual manufacturer and may damage devices, so we are unable to provide those.) Just look for the signs on Level A like the one below or ask for help at the Information Services Desk.

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Campus-wide Newspaper Subscriptions

The library has set up campus-wide subscriptions to ​The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post, which are available to all current faculty, staff, and students.

  • The New York Times: After registration, users may log in from anywhere or use the app.  Users who already have an account with a Trinity e-mail don’t need to register again.  Faculty & staff must re-register every year.  Please check the Library A-Z entry for more details. Sign up online​.
  • The Wall Street Journal: Individuals must create a personal account while on the network. Once an account is set up, access is via login/password from anywhere, including the mobile WSJ app. Content from the last four years is available on a rolling basis. Sign up online​.
  • Washington Post: No registration required.

Trinidad Carnival Images from Trinity’s Trinidad Global Learning Program!

Photo by Jeffrey Chock for Trinity in Trinidad Global Learning Site

Nearly 400 photographic slides of Trinidad Carnival dating from about 1998 were produced in association with the Trinity College in Trinidad Global Learning Site.  These have been digitized and published online by our Digital Collections and Services staff and are publicly available to view as the Trinidad Carnival Images collection in our licensed Artstor image repository.  The images document Carnival activities, participants, and many traditional characters and costumes.   https://library.artstor.org/#/collection/10003682. Continue reading

Take a break, read a good book!

There isn’t much better on a chilly autumn day than curling up under a blanket with a good book.  If you’re looking for the right book to do just that, the library has you covered!  Along with the myriad of classic works that can be found in the main collection the library has a dedicated collection of over 1300 popular fiction novels, young adult novels, popular nonfiction books, and graphic novels in the Leisure Reading and Graphic Novels collections.

Can’t find the book you want?  Let us know and we will do our best to add it to the collection!  You can leave requests for new purchases on the suggestion whiteboard located next to the Leisure Reading collection or send requests directly to Kim Rinaldo (leisure reading) or Rob Walsh (graphic novels).

Here are just a few of the new books added to these collections this year:

  • The Cabin at the End of the World, Paul Tremblay (2018 Bram Stoker Award Winner)
  • The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal (2019 Hugo Award Winner)
  • Celestial Bodies, Jokha Alharthi (2019 Man Booker Prize Winner)
  • Good Omens, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (Student Request)
  • Neuromancer, William Gibson (Student Request)
  • The Overstory, Richard Powers (2019 Pulitzer Prize Winner)
  • Sailor Moon Vol. 1-3, Naoko Takeuchi (Student Request)
  • So B. It, Sarah Weeks (Student Request)
  • Skyward, Brandon Sanderson (Student Request)
  • Spiderman Noir, David Hine (Student Request)
  • Umbrella Academy Vol. 1, Gerard Way (Student Request)

New this year to the library is the Wellness Collection.  Books in this collection address wellness topics relevant to young adults in general and college students in particular, such as healthy eating, self-love, fitness, social skills, and managing stress.  Feel free to request new purchases for the wellness collection too, either by writing your request on the suggestion whiteboard or sending it to Kim Rinaldo.

These collections can be found on Level A near the Watkinson Library entrance.  Books from these collections are also often featured on the displays near the library’s front desk.  October’s display theme is horror, so if you’re a fan of scary stories be sure to check it out!  You can also see a sample of the books in these three collections at the Mather Hall pop up libraries.  These pop up libraries run from noon to 1:30 on October 23, November, 6, November 20, and December 11 and can be found at a table in the front entrance of Mather Hall.

“Commencement Book” now available for view in Digital Repository

It is sometimes called Bishop Brownell’s Book, or the Commencement Book. Peter Knapp in his Trinity College in the Twentieth Century simply calls it, “The Book.”

Not to be confused with the Matriculation Book, “‘The Book’ is a small, early-19th century record book that all recipients of Trinity degrees touch during Commencement ceremonies,” Knapp states.  The Book remains unnamed due in part to its contents: its pages contain details of the Commencement exercises and degrees, prayers for graduates in Latin, and include signatures from more recent Trinity College presidential inaugurations. It is a curious and important piece of Trinity history, originating from a legendary mix-up during the first Commencement ceremony in 1827. College President Thomas Church Brownell intended for students to place their hands on a Bible during commencement exercises, but either couldn’t find one or realized he didn’t bring it with him to the ceremony, and so he used his personal record book instead.

“By chance, the Book became one of the college’s oldest traditions,” Peter Knapp writes. “The Book’s use at Commencement appears to have been inconsistent in the years following the Bishop’s Presidency, but it can be said with certainty that all Trinity graduates have touched it” since the 1946-47 academic year.

Thanks to the efforts of College Archivist Eric Stoykovich, the Book was recently retrieved for digitization and is now available to view in the Digital Repository. The physical book resides in a safe location on campus in order to ensure its preservation for annual use at Commencement.

Source: Trinity College in the Twentieth Century by Peter Knapp, pages 232-33.

A new way we acquire books

by Lorraine Huddy, CTW Librarian for Collaborative Projects

The libraries at Trinity College and its CTW partners, Connecticut College and Wesleyan University, are now using Evidence-Based Acquisitions (a.k.a. EBA).  We implemented this model with well-known content providers including JSTOR, Project Muse, and most recently, Oxford University Press.

How does EBA work?  The publisher/vendor grants access to a very large pool of ebook titles for one year. At the end of the year, usage reports show how many times a specific title was viewed or downloaded. Using this evidence, the libraries select which titles to purchase. With purchase, the library is given perpetual access to the title.

What a crazy idea, right?  Buy books after they’re actually used instead of forecasting which books might be used, and buying those.  Publishers and vendors literally provide access to thousands of titles and the libraries only buy the ones used the most by our faculty and students?  Sounds like a win-win proposition for the libraries!

What’s the catch?  What do publishers and vendors get out of this plan?   In the EBA model, providers know ahead of time what the financial spend will be.  As part of the contract, the libraries and provider negotiate the financial commitment: how much the library will commit to the EBA program, using these funds to purchase perpetual access to specific titles.  The amount varies by provider but they typically use a spend ratio based on the value of the pool of titles the libraries have access to (i.e. $1 spent for every $15 of value.)  On their end, libraries typically consider how much they’ve spent on a publisher’s titles in past years to calculate what they’re willing to commit to the EBA program.

How’s it working out?  For the most part, so far, so good.  JSTOR ebooks are getting very high use. On the other hand, Project Muse ebooks are not used as much as expected and due to overlap with JSTOR titles, Trinity will withdraw from this program in January. The Oxford EBA program was set up in July 2019 so it’s too early to tell, but the list of titles in this package is very promising.

We are watching these programs closely in case of diminishing returns over time. The number of new titles added each year is small compared to the entire pool of titles – will there be enough new content that is of interest and value to our students and faculty?  Should we commit less to these programs each year as a result of this new vs. old content imbalance?  As with other library resources, the proof to retain is overall usage.  As long as we’re able to identify enough unique title purchases that spend down the annual financial commitment, there’s good reason to maintain these programs.

Wall Street Journal current issues now available

The Library now has a site license for the Wall Street Journal (wsj.com).  All users must create an individual account in order to access the content.  Once they have activated an account, they will have access to WSJ, WSJ+, WSJ newsletters and podcasts.  Users may also download the app for mobile devices.

Any questions may be directed to Jennifer.vansickle@trincoll.edu.

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