Category: Uncategorized (page 1 of 10)

Need Quiet Study Space? – Reserve a Group Study Space Today

Need a quiet study space?

In general, the higher you go up in levels within the library, the quieter the space becomes.

  • Level 3 is designated Silent Space
  • Level 2 is designated Quiet Space
  • Level 1, A and B are Social Spaces
  • Level C also tends to be a quiet space, although seating on this level is limited.

You can, however also book a Group Study Space located on levels 3, 2 and 1 within the library.

The Library provides a variety of spaces and tools to facilitate research and learning in the Library. Group study rooms may be reserved by Trinity College students for groups of two or more for group study or other curricular activities.  Time slots are 1 hour long but one can select up to 2 time slots per day, for a maximum of 2 hours.

Reservations require a valid @trincoll.edu email, and room access requires a current Trinity ID.

Unreserved rooms that are empty after the start of a time slot are available on a first-come basis until the next scheduled time period.  Otherwise room use requires reservations through the web form, linked below.

New library e-book purchases

The Library is pleased to announce a purchase (in progress) of the following e-book collections:

Palgrave e-book archive (pre-2005).

Palgrave e-books 2005-2015

Springer e-book archive (pre-1997, English)

Palgrave publishes in the social sciences and humanities, whereas Springer focuses on math and sciences.   As with our current Palgrave and Springer holdings, these collections are DRM-free and are a one-time purchase with no ongoing payments.

Did you know? As a Trinity faculty member, staff member, or student, you may buy a print copy of Palgrave/Springer e-books on demand for only $24.99 each.  Look for the My Copy icon on the e-book table of contents page.

 

Featured image “ebook” by Jamais Cascio  licensed under Creative Commons CC BY-2.0 .

New Improved and Faster Interlibrary Loan Service

The CTW Library Consortium (Connecticut College, Trinity College, Wesleyan University) recently joined RapidILL, an interlibrary loan network of libraries committed to sharing resources and fulfilling requests more quickly.

RapidILL was founded in the late 1990s by Colorado State University Libraries and now includes libraries from around the world.  The majority of members are in the United States and Canada, but others are in Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

At Trinity, Library interlibrary loan specialist Marcelino Velez has worked on learning the new system and getting us started in the program. The integration process began in late Fall 2018 and was completed in January 2019.  The first requests trickled in before spring semester began but the libraries are now at full speed, handling both lending and borrowing requests for articles and book chapters on a daily basis.  The libraries plan to add full book requests to the Rapid setup this coming summer.

The primary benefits of RapidILL are being part of a very large and diverse sharing network whose members are committed to fulfilling lending requests within 24 hours.  This quicker turnaround is possible because requests are sent to libraries that own the item electronically first.  This means many requests are fulfilled automatically without staff intervention.  So despite a higher volume of requests coming into the CTW libraries, the staff time needed to handle these requests should stay the same.

Best of all, it’s a win-win situation for faculty and students.  Most of your requests for articles and book chapters should arrive faster and there’s nothing new to learn in terms of placing requests from non-CTW libraries. Rapid is completely integrated with our existing interlibrary loan software (ILLiad), and everything is handled completely behind the scenes. There is nothing new you need to do, but you should see an improvement in time to delivery of the requested material.

Information Services Desk Update

Merging the help desk and circulation desk operations has proven to be both challenging and rewarding, but we are finally getting into the groove of things and feeling like a single unit at the Information Services Desk! Many may know us as staffed by team members whose previous expertise was limited to either library circulation or help desk services, but that is changing as we continue to cross-train and hire new team members.

The newest employee to join our team is Catherine Simpson, who fills the role of Public Services Specialist here at the Information Services Desk. Catherine performs a variety of tasks, working collaboratively with staff and students, and providing excellent, friendly service. Together, our unit continues to strive for overall improvement of services, and we are constantly evaluating the ways in which we operate day-to-day. Our main goal is to assist Trinity community members in every way possible, and we aim to achieve this goal by offering excellent customer service, building a great team of students and staff, continuously learning and being the best we can be. Feel free to stop by our desk to say hello, meet our new team member, Catherine, or just to challenge us with any questions you may have!

SGA Provides Textbooks for Reserves

Thanks to support from the Trinity Student Government Association, the library has added these textbooks to the reserve collection:

  • Calculus by Laura Taalman, 17th edition
  • Starting Out with Java: Early Objects by Tony Gaddis, 6th edition
  • Starting Out with Python by Tony Gaddis, 4th edition
  • Economics- Principles, Problems, & Policies by Campbell McConnell, 20th edition
  • Physical Chemistry by Thomas Engel, 3rd edition (coming  soon)

 

These books, and others, are available for 3 hour check out from the Information Services Desk. The SGA, faculty, Dean’s Office and the Library all recognize that the cost of textbooks are a challenge for students, and are increasing support to make more texts available at reasonable prices. Several classes should happen in the fall with open education resources used as texts as well, further helping to mitigate costs. If you have ideas about other ways the library can help we’d like to hear from you!

Welcome back students and faculty!

Newly Combined Services The ITS Help Desk and the Library Circulation Desk are now located together on Level A forming the Information Services Desk. All ITS and Library support is now provided from this central location. Please note that all help desk requests should now be submitted at http://ishelp.trincoll.edu.

Reminder for Faculty: Please submit course viewing /reserve requests as soon as possible. All course reserve requests, including for streaming video, should be submitted through the IS ticketing system at ishelp.trincoll.edu​. Course reserve guidelines are available here.  This fall we will begin using Kaltura instead of Trinflix to deliver streaming video – please allow additional processing time for your request.

Open Education Resources (OER) Faculty Stipend Program and October 2 Common Hour

Studies suggest that, over the past thirty years, the average cost of college textbooks has risen more than 800%, and more than 60% of students report that they will skip purchasing a textbook at some point in their academic careers due to costs.   Trinity students are not immune from the pressure rising textbook costs cause and have asked for help with this issue. We aim to explore whether we can help control textbook costs through the adoption of low-cost or no cost textbooks and other resources available through the Trinity College Library collection and the Watkinson Library and Archives collection

Open Educational Resources are openly licensed textbooks, documents and media that may be used for teaching and learning. Open licensing means that material in OER texts can be modified and shared without fear of copyright restrictions or exorbitant charges. OER texts are usually online, but frequently offer print formats as well. OER texts usually have little or no cost for students who use them.

There is a growing body of OER materials available from other institutions and their partners. Perhaps the best known examples include: Rice University’s launch of OpenStax College, MIT’s OpenCourseWare, and the University of Minnesota’s Open Textbook Library. Other resources are available through the libraries at Trinity, such as Springer eBooks, which allow students to buy print copies of any etext in their collection for $25. With these resources available, we believe that some faculty will be able to find the high-quality resources they need among OER collections. We recognize that significant time and effort would be needed for any faculty who wanted to adopt OER. Therefore we have created a new program offering support and stipends to Trinity College faculty interested in exploring OER in their classes.

For further reading and resource links on OER, see http://courseguides.trincoll.edu/oer .

“Open Education in Practice: How Open Educational Resources Can Benefit a Private Liberal Arts College”

Please join us for a Common Hour panel discussion on October 2, 2018 in the Raether LITC room 181. A panel of faculty and students from Trinity College and the University of Hartford will introduce the main features of OER, share some advantages of their use on small, private campuses, and explain how they incorporate these materials into their syllabuses. Light lunch will be served.

Faculty Stipends

Trinity College invites applications for its 2018-2019 OER support stipends. The purpose of the stipends is to assist faculty in the examination and potential adoption of OER for Fall 2019 classes. The $1500 stipend is divided into two parts: Selected applicants will receive a $500 stipend for the Spring 2019 semester. Successful applicants will work with Information Services staff during the Spring 2019 semester to identify and review potential OER texts for a Fall 2019 class. By May 10, 2019 the faculty member will notify the committee in writing that they have either 1) selected a text, with the name of the text or 2) not selected a text and provide a brief written explanation as to why no available text seemed appropriate. Those applicants who opt to continue and use an OER text in class will then receive the additional $1000 stipend.

Application Process:

Faculty may apply using this brief OER stipend application form.  A maximum of six applications will be selected. Applications are due November 1, and decisions will be made by December 4.

Selection Criteria:

We will select up to six courses with two each from humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Preference will be given to:

  • Required courses
  • Courses with large numbers of students
  • Courses currently using an expensive textbook
  • Course where the text(s) proposed to be covered by OER text(s) or resources from the library represent the bulk of textbook costs for the class
  • Applicant will teach the course in Fall 2019

Applications are due November 1. Decisions will be made by a committee comprised of a representative from the Office of the Dean of Faculty and two representatives from Information Services. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by December 4.

 

 

 

10,000 Pre-WWI Postcards Available Online

The Digital Collections and Services Department recently completed digitization of the George Watson Cole postcard collection in the Watkinson Library, now publicly available online in ArtStor. The collection consists of over 10,000 European postcards depicting pre-WWI England, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Austria, and Belgium; there are also included several hundred American postcards, primarily of everyday life in Southern California and Native Americans in the Southwest.

George Watson Cole (1850-1939)  was a librarian and bibliographer, friend and contemporary of famous librarians Melvil Dewey and Charles Cutter. Born in Warren, CT, he became librarian in Fitchburg, MA and enrolled in the first class of Melvil Dewey’s library school at Columbia University. He received an honorary doctorate from Trinity in 1920, and donated the European portion of his extensive postcard collection to the Watkinson Library. He put his librarianship to good use in organizing and labeling his postcard collection.

In the early 1900s, Cole embarked on travels throughout Europe and the United States and collected every postcard he could find at various stops in towns, cities, museums, and landmarks. Cole believed in postcards’ value as historic records of how things appeared in the past. Further, he believed that keeping these visual representations should be a constant action that tracked changes over time. The images in the postcards are a slice of life: people, streets, maps, monuments, art museums, and churches as they appeared at the turn of the century and before two world wars devastated Europe.

Toward the end of his life, in 1933, Cole decided to donate the his personal papers, books, and postcard collection (which he estimated contained over 25,000 postcards) to the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass. As the AAS only collects American materials, Robert Vail the AAS librarian accepted Cole’s gifts of his personal papers and American postcards, but declined the European half of the collection (Source: Postcards in the Library: Invaluable Visual Resources edited by Norman D. Stevens).

And whether by accident or not, Cole left about 500 Californian postcards along with his European collection to Trinity. The California postcards depict everyday life from the Southern California area — Avalon, Mount Lowe, Los Angeles, Orange County, Long Beach, Venice, and Santa Monica. A small number of American postcards in the Trinity collection also depict Native Americans in New Mexico, Arizona, and California.

They are a testimony to how so much has changed — but also to what has not.

Click on the postcards below for a larger view!

“Nothing in print is more universal than the postcard.”

— Postcards, the world in miniature; a plan for their systematic arrangement, with an index (1935) by George Watson Cole.

Another Pizza Party Success

Every semester, students expect it. And, every semester, we deliver it! I’m not referring to  research help, of which we provide A LOT. Rather, I’m referring to the Pizza Party Study Break that we host at the end of every semester. Outside of teaching, it’s one of my favorite parts of my job, and I don’t even eat pizza.

On the evening of May 7th, nearly one hundred students were lined up outside of the Phelan Room fifteen minutes before the pizza party began. Within half an hour, only a few slices of pizza remained. Over two hundred students were carbed-up, and ready to return to their studies. Thanks to those who joined us. We’ll definitely host another study break in December!

 

Information Privacy and Security: Teaching, Research, and Student Success

Thursday, May 17, at 11am, followed by lunch, Digital Scholarship Classroom (LITC 181)

A panel of faculty and staff will address the complex ethical, legal, and technical
dimensions of information privacy and security in digital contexts.

  • Jennifer Baszile, Dean of Student Success and Career Development
  • Christina Boyles, Digital Scholarship Coordinator
  • Antonio Crespo, Chief Information Security Officer
  • Jason Jones, Director of Educational Technology
  • Ewa Syta, Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Erin Valentino, Director of Research Services, moderator

Printable flyer

 

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